Cairo geniza


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Cairo geniza

(kō`rō gən`ēzə), archive of ancient Jewish manuscripts found in the synagogue of Fostat-Cairo, Egypt (built 882). In the 1890s western scholars visited the synagogue and removed the materials to the Bodleian Library at the Univ. of Oxford, the Jewish Theological Seminary, New York, and other major repositories. The materials are an extremely important resource for the study of biblical writings and translations, ancient Jewish liturgies, communal records, and the relations between Jews and Arabs in medieval Islamic society.
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The papers on Jewish charity are all based on the records found in the Cairo Geniza.
Experiments are being conducted on degraded documents from sources such as the Cairo Geniza, copies of which are located at the national liturgy project at BGU, the El-Aqsa manuscript library in Jerusalem and the Al-Azar manuscript library in Cairo.
Kraemer, a professor at the University of Chicago, draws on documents from the Cairo geniza, a treasure of 300,000 manuscripts discovered in Fustat, or old Cairo, and on Arab historians like Jamal al-Din Ibn al-Qifti.
The two medieval Cairo Geniza manuscripts of the same Damascus Scroll, found in 18961897, vary significantly from one another in one column but otherwise there are no major variations from the Qumran and Geniza manuscripts (Vermes 1995:95).
Cohen, The Voice of the Poor in the Middle Ages: An Anthology of Documents from the Cairo Geniza (Princeton: Princeton University Press 2005)
But whilst the documents provide a wealth of information on many areas of life (see, for example, the documents of the Cairo Geniza published by Goitein (1967-83)), there are areas and periods for which there is little or no written documentation.
In constructing his narrative, Khalilieh draws on diverse types of sources: fatwas travel accounts, navigational literature, a few international commercial and diplomatic treaties, and quite heavily on Cairo Geniza documents.
The conference was held one hundred years after the discovery of the Hebrew text of Ben Sira (Ecclesiasticus) among the manuscripts from the Cairo geniza.
The first "Qumran" text to have been discovered in modern times was the Damascus Document or Zadokite Fragment (siglum: CD), found in the Cairo Geniza and published from two fragmentary manuscripts, one of sixteen pages and one of two pages, by Solomon Schechter in 1910 under the title Fragments of a Zadokite Work.
Relying on the finds in the Cairo Geniza, he argues for the multiplicity of Palestinian versions.
Shaked, Professor of Iranian Studies at The Hebrew University, has published two books containing both amulets and incantations written on metal and on clay bowls, as well as later related material from the Cairo Geniza.
This publication of new magical texts from the Cairo Geniza was undertaken by a highly competent research team and resulted in an excellent edition of fascinating texts.

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