calcium phosphate

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calcium phosphate

[′kal·se·əm ′fäs‚fāt]
(inorganic chemistry)
Any phosphate of calcium.
Any of the following three calcium orthophosphates, all of which are white or colorless in pure form: Ca(H2PO4)2 is used as a fertilizer, as a plastics stabilizer, and in baking powder, and is also known as acid calcium phosphate, calcium dihydrogen phosphate, monobasic calcium phosphate, monocalcium phosphate; CaHPO4 is used in pharmaceuticals, animal feeds, and toothpastes, and is also known as calcium hydrogen phosphate, dibasic calcium phosphate, dicalcium orthophosphate, dicalcium phosphate; Ca3(PO4)2 is used as a fertilizer, and is also known as tribasic calcium phosphate, tricalcium phosphate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jablonski, X-Ray Diffraction Powder Patterns of Calcium Phosphates, Anal.
Calcium phosphates are of interest for many biomedical applications due to their good biocompatibility and bioactivity.
The present study was aimed at preparing and studying the properties of nano forms of additional calcium phosphates of molar Ca/P ratios from 1.
1)] and other calcium phosphate phases using the software "Chemist"
6a) showed the pattern of amorphous calcium phosphate with the presence of some acid phosphate (870 [cm.
Meer, Morphology and composition of nanograde calcium phosphate needle-like crystals formed by simple hydrothermal treatment, J.
Brown (1962-1993) Chemical physics, crystallography, calcium phosphate chemistry, thermodynamics.
Shozo Takagi (1978-present) Calcium phosphate biomaterials, prevention of dental caries, quantitative digitized microradiography, single crystal and powder x-ray crystallography.
Key words: biomaterial; bone graft; bone repair; dicalcium phosphate anhydrous; hydroxyapatite; self-setting calcium phosphate cement; tetracalcium phosphate.
The relativ e stability of these two salts is the major driving force for the setting reactions that occur in calcium phosphate cements.
Apatites are thermodynamically the most stable phases among the calcium phosphates and, therefore, can be considered as the probable end product in many reactions.
Eckert, Hydrogen environments in calcium phosphates.