Calder


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Calder

Alexander. 1898--1976, US sculptor, who originated mobiles and stabiles (moving or static abstract sculptures, generally suspended from wire).
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A work of extensive and authoritative scholarship, The People's War was written with the brio of youth and some of its anger--'the old gang [of wartime politicians] had become the old gangsters' (Potter's words) and the effect of the war had not been to 'sweep society onto a new course, but to hasten its progress along the old grooves', Calder concluded.
In Embattled Garrisons, Calder analyzes different options to find ways of dispelling the anti- American clouds hanging over U.
Calder and Greiman originally faced 377 charges but both struck a plea bargain deal with prosecutors.
Over a five-year period, the case would wind its way through the British Columbia Supreme Court and the court of appeal before Calder and the Nisga'a would taste victory thanks to a Supreme Court of Canada ruling that Aboriginal title to traditional lands existed, regardless of any government policy to the contrary.
Calder admits he maintained his ``objectivity'' by not working in Hollywood.
Accusing such elitists of adhering to the myth of lost economic virtue, Calder notes how adversaries repeatedly predicted that instant credit would destroy the nineteenth century Protestant ethic of hard work and manly self-reliance and promote instant gratification and unbridled hedonism among the masses.
Officially, Calder is slated to act as a consultant to Bertelsmann's music unit, BMG, as the company integrates the Zomba labels (with an expected tenure of six to 12 months).
Alexander Calder combined Constructivist methods and materials with abstract forms of the kind used by Surrealist artists, some made by people he met when he first went to Paris.
Calder concludes from this history of credit that twentieth-century America is not the bottomless pit of hedonism that many writers have suggested.
The book in hand is Financing the American Dream: A Cultural History of Consumer Credit, by Lendol Calder, and, although it is a revision of a doctoral dissertation, it reads like a work of seasoned scholarship.
Notorious for his reluctance to comment on his own work, Calder has for several decades fascinated art historians and critics seeking to identify the sources of his artistic vision.
A centennial exhibition reveals The playful Alexander Calder to have Been more serious, multifaceted, and complex Than previous shows have allowed.