Caliban


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Caliban,

in astronomy, one of the natural satellites, or moons, of UranusUranus
, in astronomy, 7th planet from the sun, at a mean distance of 1.78 billion mi (2.87 billion km), with an orbit lying between those of Saturn and Neptune; its period of revolution is slightly more than 84 years.
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.

Caliban

(kal -ă-ban) See Uranus's satellites.

Caliban

[′kal·ə‚ban]
(astronomy)
A small satellite of Uranus in a retrograde orbit with a mean distance of 4,475,000 miles (7,200,000 kilometers), eccentricity of 0.081, and sidereal period of 1.59 years.

Caliban

his name is anagram of cannibal. [Br. Lit.: The Tempest]

Caliban

misshapen “missing link.” [Br. Lit.: The Tempest]

Caliban

A declarative annotation language for controlling the partitioning and placement of the evaluation of expressions in a distributed functional language. Designed by Paul Kelly <phjk@doc.ic.ac.uk>, Imperial College.

["Functional Programming for Loosely-coupled Multiprocessors", P. Kelly, Pitman/MIT Press, 1989].
References in periodicals archive ?
As Caliban asserts, this black stone awaits those who, in an effort to avoid themselves as they exist in the present moment, focus instead on some illusory self in some supposedly more spiritual future.
This unresolved conflict is a conflict in Wordsworth and a conflict within Auden, who has heard the "real Word" of his imagination telling him something about the indeterminacy of his existence, something, performed by the only subject anyone has, Caliban, to which his intellect (the angry audience, in an intellectual state of "all wish and no resolve") objects (CP 442).
In introducing Shakespeare's character Caliban from Te Tempest, Rodriguez opens a volatile subject without acknowledging its volatility.
Ray Porter and Bo Foxworth are delightful as the drunkards who ply Caliban (the excellent Stephen Weingartner) with liquor.
For instance, after searching opening chapters entitled "Tragedy and the Nation" and "History and the Nation," on Othello and the second tetralogy respectively, the concern with history and memory unaccountably disappears for the next two chapters, which usefully differentiate the forms of slavery represented by Ariel and Caliban and investigate the scapegoat mechanism in The Merchant of Venice, before resurfacing in a series of chapters on Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth.
Chris Hirsh takes on the dual challenge of playing the shipwrecked Prince Ferdinand and island creature Caliban.
The isle is full of noises, sounds and sweets airs that give delight," intones Caliban in his big Act II aria (ardently sung by tenor John David De Haan).
They hang, they dangle, they gather in piles to provide a cave for Caliban and they blow in the stormy wind like wash day in a terraced street in the days when a mangle was a mod con.
The tradition of viewing The Tempest in general and Caliban in particular as examples of colonialism and Western exploitation has a long history outside the West, dating back to the nineteenth century.
Yet this magical island, peopled by its over-lord Prospero and his attentive spirit Ariel, not to mention the odd almost-drowned young prince, a dangerous half-human monster, Caliban, and various almost-drowned courtiers, nutters, boozers and psychos is kind of Eden, where magic can inspire love and where the behaviour of its inhabitants reflects what Elizabethan audiences probably expected of half-civilised dwellers in the New World or the "Bermoothes" which is where this island is set.
uk I, Peaseblossom / I, Caliban Tim Crouch's unique interpretations of Shakespeare's classic plays A Midsummer's Night Dream and The Tempest re-tell these famous stories from the fresh and sometimes startling perspectives of characters usually consigned to the sidelines.
But the double bill, I, Peaseblossom/I, Caliban, is theatre creator Tim Crouch's unique interpretation of the Bard's classic texts A Midsummer Nights Dream and The Tempest.