Callirrhoë

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Related to Callirrhoe: Chaldene, Taygete

Callirrhoë

(kəlĭr`ōē), in astronomy, one of the 39 known moons, or natural satellites, of JupiterJupiter
, in astronomy, 5th planet from the sun and largest planet of the solar system. Astronomical and Physical Characteristics

Jupiter's orbit lies beyond the asteroid belt at a mean distance of 483.6 million mi (778.
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Callirrhoë

(kəlĭr`ōē): see AlcmaeonAlcmaeon
, in Greek legend, son of Amphiaraüs and Eriphyle, a leader of the expedition of the Epigoni against Thebes. He murdered his mother in revenge for his father's death and consequently was haunted by the Erinyes until he found haven on Achelous' island.
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Callirrhoë

demands of husband former wife’s necklace and robe. [Gk. Legend: NCE, 55]
References in periodicals archive ?
Callirhoe's feeble brother Emathion reveals that, on the advice of the oracle at Dodona, Callirrhoe is to be sacrificed to save the city.
The similarities between Callirrhoe and Erechtheus begin with the sacrifice of the female protagonist, as a prelude to the re-establishment of order.
Like Swinburne's Chthonia, Callirrhoe insists that she is given the opportunity to offer her blood sacrifice that the city might be saved from destruction: "For my people, I / Come joyfully to die; each breath I draw / Delays deliv'rance; choose where thou wilt strike" (III.
As the blood pours from Coresus' body, Callirrhoe has an epiphany: "I am a Maenad; I must have love's wine, / Coresus, and you die before my face, / Leaving me here to thirst" (III.
Having been abandoned by her father and brother, the motherless Callirrhoe is free, albeit briefly, to embrace her new-found adult sexual identity.
Bradley and Cooper indicate that what is left is the opportunity to form a new society, based on the loving, self-sacrificing model of Coresus and Callirrhoe.
After much pain and suffering sexual love and desire triumphs in Callirrhoe, whereas love remains a divisive source of pain in Atalanta.
Yet, I would argue that in Callirrhoe Michael Field achieves a more positive and optimistic expression of Dionysian passion than Swinburne.