Calmatives


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Calmatives

 

a group of drugs with various chemical compositions that exert a calming effect on the central nervous system. Calmatives include sedatives proper, which consist mostly of bromine preparations (sodium or potassium bromide) and preparations of plant origin, for example, tinctures and extracts of heliotrope, motherwort, and passionflower. Synthetic and natural calmatives are often combined, for example, in Bekhterev’s mixture.

Calmatives intensify inhibition and reduce excitability. They are used to treat irritability, insomnia, neuroses, hypertension, and other conditions. Some of the psychotropic agents introduced in the second half of the 20th century were found to have a calmative effect as well (seeTRANQUILIZERS and NEUROLEPTICS). Soporifics taken in small doses and some cardiac agents, for example, Adonis preparations, also have a calmative effect.

References in periodicals archive ?
Barring such results as those the Russians faced when 116 innocents were inadvertently killed by the pumped gas, calmatives are a seductive form of "non-lethal weapons" for use in crowd control because of their "reversible effects.
The Advantages and Limitations of Calmatives for Use As a Non-Lethal Technique examines the viability of using various psychopharmaceutical agents in a number of military and civilian contexts.
In addition to available stun guns, people catcher nets, and sonar devices, the JNLWD believes that calmatives hold the additional promise of providing ways to subdue large, unruly sectors of a human population by blanket sedation.
36) It was concerned not so much with the harm that calmatives may cause as with the likelihood that any permissible chemical weapon, no matter how nonlethal, opens a door that will eventually lead nations to build chemical weapons of mass destruction.
Putting aside the question about whether some nonlethal weapons such as calmatives may be lawfully used in armed conflict or law enforcement, (30) the only remaining question is whether nonlethal weapons in general are a just and lawful means to wage war, or whether any medicalized weapons would cause superfluous injury and unnecessary suffering.
Calmatives and the ADS are neither designed nor intended to be used as force multipliers; they aim rather at reducing civilian casualties.