Calypso

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Calypso,

in astronomy, one of the named moons, or natural satellites, of SaturnSaturn,
in astronomy, 6th planet from the sun. Astronomical and Physical Characteristics of Saturn

Saturn's orbit lies between those of Jupiter and Uranus; its mean distance from the sun is c.886 million mi (1.
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. Also known as Saturn XIV (or S14), Calypso is a small, irregularly shaped (nonspherical) body measuring about 21 mi (34 km) by 13.5 mi (22 km) by 13.5 mi (22 km); it orbits Saturn at a mean distance of 183,093 mi (294,660 km), and has an orbital period of 1.8878 earth days—the rotational period is unknown but is assumed to be the same as the orbital period. Calypso was discovered in 1980 by a group led by a team at the Univ. of Arizona led by Bradford A. Smith from ground-based photographs taken with prototype cameras designed for the Hubble Space Telescope. Calypso is co-orbital with two other moons, TelestoTelesto
, in astronomy, one of the named moons, or natural satellites, of Saturn. Also known as Saturn XIII (or S13), Telesto is an irregularly shaped (nonspherical) body measuring about 21 mi (34 km) by 17 mi (28 km) by 16 mi (26 km); it orbits Saturn at a mean distance of
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 and TethysTethys
, in astronomy, one of the named moons, or natural satellites, of Saturn. Also known as Saturn III (or S3), Tethys is 659 mi (1060 km) in diameter, orbits Saturn at a mean distance of 183,093 mi (294,660 km), and has equal orbital and rotational periods of 1.
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; that is, they orbit Saturn at the same distance. Calypso and Telesto are two of the smallest moons in the solar system.

calypso,

a form of folk song developed on the island of Trinidad and also popular in other Caribbean countries. Thought to have begun with 19th-century black slaves, calypso songs developed and continue to be used in the traditional pre-Lenten carnivalcarnival,
communal celebration, especially the religious celebration in Catholic countries that takes place just before Lent. Since early times carnivals have been accompanied by parades, masquerades, pageants, and other forms of revelry that had their origins in pre-Christian
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. Drawing mainly on both African and European sources, the music uses varieties of some 50 traditional melodies and employs a ballad form in either 2/4 or 4/4 time with syncopated phrasing. Orchestration often includes drums, guitars, maracas, brass and wind instruments, and, since they developed in the mid-1940s, steel drums (originally modified oil drums). At first sung in a Creole French, calypso has been performed in a lilting patois-tinged English by colorfully named artists since the early 20th cent. Frequently improvised, lyrics are witty, mocking, colloquial, and topical, usually addressing current events or concerns. Calypso traveled outside Trinidad in the 1920s and 30s and, in a highly commercialized form, became very popular in the United States during the late 1940s and 1950s. Probably the most famous of the many 20th-century calypso artists are, in Trinidad, the Mighty Sparrow, and, in the United States, Harry Belafonte.

Bibliography

See studies by K. Q. Warner (1982, repr. 1999), D. R. Hill (1993), L. Regis (1998), and J. Cowley (1999).


Calypso

(kəlĭp`sō), nymph, daughter of Atlas, in Homer's Odyssey. She lived on the island of Ogygia and there entertained Odysseus for seven years. Although she offered to make him immortal if he would remain, Odysseus spurned the offer and continued his journey.

Calypso

(kă-lip -soh) A small irregularly shaped satellite of Saturn, discovered in 1980. It is a coorbital satellite with Telesto and Tethys. See Table 2, backmatter.

Calypso

 

a French oceanographic vessel. Built in 1942, the Calypso operates under programs of the Ministry of National Education and the Geographic Society of France. The vessel is 47 m long, 7.7 m wide, and displaces 360 tons. Its free cruising range is 5,000 nautical miles (9,260 km); it has a crew of 12 and ten scientific workers. The vessel is equipped with oceanographic winches and has special gear for underwater research and television and motion-picture filming. In 1967, under the command of J.-Y. Cousteau, the Calypso began research operations in the tropical seas of the world.

Calypso

[kə′lip·sō]
(astronomy)
A small, irregularly shaped satellite of Saturn that librates about the leading Lagrangian point of Tethys's orbit.

Calypso

promises Odysseus eternal youth and immortality if he will stay with her forever. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 166]

calypso

1
1. a popular type of satirical, usually topical, West Indian ballad, esp from Trinidad, usually extemporized to a percussive syncopated accompaniment
2. a dance done to the rhythm of this song

calypso

2
a rare N temperate orchid, Calypso (or Cytherea) bulbosa, whose flower is pink or white with purple and yellow markings
References in periodicals archive ?
The calypsonian Lord Superior in admonishing those youths who had taken up arms in opposition to the regime in a tragically doomed attempt at guerrilla warfare in the 1970s had advised them (12) that rather than guerilla activity they should
He lent his remarkable talents and skill as an oral performer to advocate for the PNM, especially in the early years and was popularly accepted as the movement's calypsonian.
The calypso is a praise song to the leaders who, according to the calypsonian, took a multi-racial, multi-cultural, and wealthy society living in harmony and relative equality to nationhood.
In "We is We" (1979), the calypsonian found those who had begun searching for ancestral roots "colour crazy" and advised them to "stop this damn race searching.
It raised the ire of elements of the East Indian community who saw themselves as painted out of this Caribbean portrait, academic purists who objected to the inaccuracy of the "same place/same ship/same trip" statement and denied the calypsonian poetic license, and feminists who took offence at what they saw as the sexist orientation of the calypso.
After writing the song "Mary, I Am Tired and Disgusted," which achieved great popularity in Port of Spain during World War II, the young composer and singer was dubbed Lord Kitchener by fellow calypsonian Growling Tiger, after the famous British military officer and statesman.
Kitchener's lineup included popular calypsonians Mighty Killer, Lord Zigfield, and Spoiler, but until the doors opened, no one knew who would prevail.
And his newly opened tent, the Calypso Review, became the must-visit Mecca for the music's most ardent followers, as Kitchener reached out to aspiring calypsonians, using his club as a kind of informal conservatory to pass along his knowledge of composition, lyric writing, and performance.
The Mighty Bomber, another Trinidadian Calypsonian, tells the "Doc," Eric Williams
retired actor, owner of a Tobagan guesthouse, and his Trinidadian factotum Jackson Phillip, retired calypsonian.
Lord Kitchener, the famous calypsonian, who has now returned to Trinidad, said: "Entering England, when the boat had about four days to land in England, I get this kind of wonderful feeling that I'm going to land on the mother country, the soil of the mo ther country.
The calypsonian Don Marshall derided his attempts to transform the CBC Radio and Television network.