Cambyses


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Related to Cambyses: royal road, Darius the Great, XERXES

Cambyses

(kămbī`sēz), two kings of the AchaemenidAchaemenids
, dynasty of ancient Persia. They were descended presumably from one Achaemenes, a minor ruler in a mountainous district of SW Iran. His successors, when Elam declined, spread their power westward.
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 dynasty of Persia. Cambyses I was king (c.600 B.C.) of Ansham, ruling as a vassal of Media. According to Herodotus he married the daughter of the Median king AstyagesAstyages
, fl. 6th cent. B.C., king of the Medes (584–c.550 B.C.), son and successor of Cyaxares. His rule was harsh, and he was unpopular. His daughter is alleged to have married the elder Cambyses and was said to be the mother of Cyrus the Great, who rebelled against
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; some scholars dispute this. Cambyses' son was Cyrus the GreatCyrus the Great
, d. 529 B.C., king of Persia, founder of the greatness of the Achaemenids and of the Persian Empire. According to Herodotus, he was the son of an Iranian noble, the elder Cambyses, and a Median princess, daughter of Astyages.
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. Cambyses II, d. 521 B.C., was the son and successor of Cyrus the Great and ruled as king of ancient Persia (529–521 B.C.). He disposed of his brother SmerdisSmerdis
, d. c.528 B.C., second son of Cyrus the Great, king of Persia. He is also called Bardiya. He was assassinated by his brother Cambyses II, who kept the murder a secret.
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 in order to gain unchallenged rule. He invaded Egypt, defeating (525 B.C.) PsamtikPsamtik
, Lat. Psammetichus, d. 609 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, founder of the XXVI dynasty. When his father, Necho, lord of Saïs under the Assyrians, was defeated and killed (663 B.C.
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 at Pelusium and sacking Memphis. His further plans of conquest in Africa were frustrated, and at home an impostor claiming to be Smerdis raised a revolt. Cambyses died, possibly by suicide, when he was putting down the insurrection. Darius IDarius I
(Darius the Great) , d. 486 B.C., king of ancient Persia (521–486 B.C.), called also Dariavaush and Darius Hystaspis (after his father, Hystaspes or Vishtaspa).
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 succeeded him.

Cambyses

had a venal judge put to death and the body skinned as covering for his judgment seat. [Gk. Hist.: Herodotus in Magill III, 479]

Cambyses

died ?522 bc, king of Persia (529--522 bc), who conquered Egypt (525); son of Cyrus the Great
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence Cambyses forces Sisamnes's son to sit as judge on a throne covered with his own father's skin (5.
Persian, in the Coptic Cambyses Romance; see Kammerzell 1987.
Tehran, December 2 (ANI): The claim made by two Italian researchers that Persian King Cambyses II lost an army in Egypt in a sandstorm in 525 BC, has been rejected by archaeologists.
But not only did each of these famous whales enjoy great individual celebrity--Nay, you may call it an ocean-wide renown; not only was he famous in life and now is immortal in forecastle stories after death, but he was admitted into all the rights, privileges, and distinctions of a name; had as much a name indeed as Cambyses or Caesar.
Nessim's tourism company Aqua Sun, undertook many high profile expeditions in the past five years in the Western Desert, including the testing of NASA's Mars droid and the search for the lost army of Cambyses.
There is also the story about Cambyses who performed an experiment with a group of Greeks and one of Indians to compare their funeral practices (3.
The scale of our scorched-earth destruction makes Cambyses II or Genghis Khan look like mild-mannered organic gardeners.
Thales of Miletus (624-547 BC): He left his country and studied with the wise men of Egypt, but was taken captive when the Persian king Cambyses invaded Ancient Egypt.
9) Above all, in this regard, it is worth remembering the puzzling description (cited by Meyerhold) of a theatrical success in 1560s London, Thomas Preston's play, Cambyses, as 'a lamentable tragedy mixed full of pleasant mirth'.
Kingsley-Smith tends more towards 'application' in her reading of Gismond as a succession play (she produces some interesting new information that might argue for Gismond as an allusion to Catherine Grey); whereas Ward situates Cambyses and Horestes squarely in the context of an increasingly urgent political debate about resistance and tyranny.
He does so with the aid of his "inner eye," his trusty henchman Colonel Meren Cambyses, and a beautiful young girl who is the reincarnation of his lost love.