Cameralism


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to Cameralism: Haskalah

Cameralism

 

a special program of studies of administrative and economic disciplines taught in European universities in the Middle Ages and in the universities of Russia from the 1850’s. In Germany, for example, this program included economic, geographic, and other subjects. Cameralism received its name from the cameral managements established in the Middle Ages by princes, dukes, and kings with extensive business activities. The so-called cameral disciplines were taught at special university departments and special schools (cameral schools) for the training of bureaucrats and administrators for the affairs of the high feudal lords; disciplines taught included mainly mining, forestry, and agricultural sciences. Marx characterized cameralism as “a medley of smatterings, through whose purgatory the hopeful candidate for the German bureaucracy has to pass” (K. Marx and F. Engels, Sock, 2nd ed., vol. 23, p. 13).

References in periodicals archive ?
Johnson, The Concept of Bureaucracy in Cameralism, 79 POL.
Cameralism and mercantilism were possible in a society that actively opposed individualism and democracy.
Ideologically, argues Szabo, the Habsburg bureaucracy was split into three ideological camps: 1) the traditionalists, who opposed any fundamental changes in the social and political structure of the monarchy; 2) the cameralists (after cameralism, the central European variant of mercantilism), who believed that the strength of a state ultimately hinged on how effectively it could tax its subjects; and 3) the party of "enlightened absolutism," led by Kaunitz.
A form of continental mercantilism, it blossomed into the eighteenth century German kind of political economy known as cameralism.