Camiola

Camiola

generously pays Bertoldo’s ransom. [Br. Lit.: The Maid of Honor, Walsh Modern, 84]
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In Massinger's Maid of Honor (1621), Sylli's lament to Camiola on losing her to the king climaxes with 'Oh, oh, oh' to which she responds: 'Do not rore so' (4.
the other characters on stage, Camiola tells them, "pray you stand
The examples of Joan herself and of Camiola, whose story allows Boccaccio to praise Joan's grandfather King Robert, can readily be seen as patronage-seeking exceptions, but it is harder to understand how Cornificia fits this justification or why Boccaccio should in her biography launch suddenly into a declaration radically at odds with his previous ideology, as Franklin has set it forth.
Hence in part the prominent voice allowed to women like Cleora and Camiola in many of Massinger's plays.
And, in the opinion of The Maid of Honour's Camiola, King Roberto's refusal to allow the payment of Bertoldo's ransom is "to breake / Th'Adamant chaines of nature and religion, / To binde up Atheisme, as a defence / To his darke counsailes" (3.
Exhibiting her exemplary ethic of imputed forgiveness, Camiola pays for the freedom of Bertoldo with the condition that he will marry her.