Minidoka Internment National Monument

(redirected from Camp Minidoka)

See also: National Parks and Monuments (table)National Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
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Minidoka Internment National Monument:

see National Parks and MonumentsNational Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (table).

Minidoka Internment National Monument

Address:PO Box 570
Hagerman, ID 83332

Phone:208-837-4793
Fax:208-837-4857
Web: www.nps.gov/miin/
Size: 73 acres.
Established: Authorized on January 17, 2001.
Location:In south-central Idaho, 17 miles northeast of Twin Falls and 21 miles East of Jerome.
Facilities:No visitor information at the monument. There is a display located at Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument Visitor Center that includes historic and modern pictures, information, and brochures.
Activities:Self-guided walk.
Special Features:Park commemorates the hardships and sacrifices of Japanese Americans interned there during World War II. Also known as the 'Hunt Camp', the Minidoka Relocation Center was a 33,000-acre site with more than 600 buildings and a total population of about 13,000 internees held from Washington, Oregon, and Alaska. It was in operation from August 1942 until October 1945 and constituted the seventh largest city in Idaho while it was operational. Most of the site's buildings and structures of the original camp have been removed. The site includes the remains of the entry guard station, waiting room, ornamental rock garden and commemorative plaques.

See other parks in Idaho.
References in periodicals archive ?
Roger Shimomura spent close to three years as a young child with Toko Shimomura and his parents in Camp Minidoka in Idaho, while his three nesei (second-generation) uncles fought in the War for the United States.
Shimomura, who was two years old at the time, and his family spent the next two years behind a barbed-wire fence at Camp Minidoka in Idaho.