Andersonville National Historic Site

(redirected from Camp Sumter)
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Andersonville National Historic Site

Address:496 Cemetery Rd
Andersonville, GA 31711

Phone:229-924-0343
Fax:229-928-9640
Web: www.nps.gov/ande/
Size: 515 acres.
Established: Authorized on October 16, 1970.
Location:10 miles north of Americus, Georgia, on GA 49.
Facilities:Picnic area, rest rooms (é), visitor center (é), museum/exhibit, self-guided tour/trail, primitive campsite (available at no charge to educational and scout groups).
Activities:Guided tour, audio driving tour.
Special Features:Andersonville, or Camp Sumter as it was officially known, was one of the largest of many Confederate military prisons established during the Civil War. During the 14 months of its existence (1864-1865), more than 45,000 Union soldiers were confined here, of which nearly 13,000 died from disease, poor sanitation, malnutrition, overcrowding, or exposure to the elements. Today, Andersonville is the only park in the National Park System to serve as a memorial to all American prisoners of war throughout the nation's history. The park also features the National Prisoners of War Museum and Andersonville National Cemetery.

See other parks in Georgia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Davis (family and regional history, Wallace State Community College, Alabama) explores some of the most controversial questions that have emerged from earlier studies of Camp Sumter, the infamous Confederate Civil War prison that has become known as Andersonville.
Georgia's Camp Sumter was the most infamous: More than 45,000 prisoners walked through its gates in the span of 14 months; about one in three never walked out.
Both sides had limited resources, so all of the prisons were severely lacking, but the conditions at Camp Sumter were extreme.
gov/ande/ - Andersonville, or Camp Sumter as it was officially known, was one of the largest of many Confederate military prisons established during the Civil War.
First named simply Anderson Prison, the stockade within the compound was named Camp Sumter.
The Confederate soldier considered to be the most reprehensible and responsible for the deplorable cruelties at the prison was the brutish, Swiss-born Captain Henry Wirz, the commander of Camp Sumter, whom MacKinlay Kantor portrayed in his 1956 Pulitzer Prize-winning Andersonville as a human demon.
Of the many prison camps built to accommodate the overflow, Andersonville (or Camp Sumter, as it was officially called) was the most notorious.

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