Camus


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Camus

Albert . 1913--60, French novelist, dramatist, and essayist, noted for his pessimistic portrayal of man's condition of isolation in an absurd world: author of the novels L'Étranger (1942) and La Peste (1947), the plays Le Malentendu (1945) and Caligula (1946), and the essays Le Mythe de Sisyphe (1942) and L'Homme révolté (1951): Nobel prize for literature 1957.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ni le texte de Camus, ni celui de Platon ne suivent la chronologie de leur heros et, a travers les sauts temporels sans continuite chronologique qui rythment le roman, une ellipse surgit au moment meme ou le lecteur souhaite comprendre les decisions prises par l'ancien avocat a la suite de la rupture.
Par ailleurs, si Nietzche nous propose la grande politique comme solution salvatrice des angoisses des temps modernes, Camus fait appel a la revolte, a la volonte de passer la solitude de l'etre humain dans sa confrontation avec l'absurde.
A grandes rasgos, ese es el contexto historico de Camus.
Camus did not have to read "A Distant Episode" in order to write his own story, whose hero is aggressively anti-French.
Several passages in particular--for instance, Srigley's poignant reading of Camus' allusion to Plato's cave in the chapter devoted to The Rebel (1951)--are elegantly written and allow for a renewed appreciation of individual works by Camus.
The KGB had other ways to finish off Albert Camus," he told AFP.
In addition, it is difficult to think of a more apt allegory for the state of constant 'defiance and revolt' (12) Camus demands of the absurd individual than one who finally forsakes the false surety of land and abandons himself to the true uncertainty of the water; imagine the drowning man kicking and struggling to the bitter end, as all drowning men surely do, not in the least discouraged by the pressing awareness of the futility of his struggle but rather, ludicrously and irrationally, spurred on by it.
Third and most important is the question of whether Camus and Levinas define the interpersonal in the same way.
Camus is just one legendary French author whose works have been translated into Bulgarian, along with Jean-Paul Sartre and Honore de Balzac, Emile Zola and other, perhaps less celebrated names: Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jacques Derrida, Marguerite Yourcenar, Patrick Modiano and Michel Tournier.
Yet Camus (who died when Paul McCartney, John Lennon and George Harrison were still touring as Johnny and the Moondogs) could not possibly have anticipated two trends since his death which make the delineation of the ontology of the Event a necessary exercise for any academic textbook following up and reporting on Camus in 2016.
It might actually be due to what Camus referred to as All or Nothing: the opacity of the sacred mind for those who are deprived of it.