Candida

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Related to Candida tropicalis: Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata

Candida

[′kan·də·də]
(mycology)
A genus of yeastlike, pathogenic imperfect fungi that produce very small mycelia.

Candida

ever faithful to husband. [Br. Lit.: Candida]
References in periodicals archive ?
Fungal bezoar and bladder rupture secondary to candida tropicalis.
Candida tropicalis is a diploid ascomycetes yeast commonly found on the skin and in digestive tracts of healthy human hosts worldwide (1).
5) We report a 16-year-old patient with CMC who developed Candida tropicalis fungemia.
Yeasts isolated from coastal sediments, including Candida lypolytica, Candida maltosa, Candida tropicalis, Candida utilis, Debaromyces hansenii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have been reported to be capable of transforming polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (Cerniglia and Crow, 1981; Hofmann, 1986: McGillivray and Sharis, 1993).
The yeast pathogens include Candida albicans and/or Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida glabrata and/or Candida krusei, which are known to cause bloodstream infections.
The four fungal species strains of Candida used were Candida albicans LHN 099, Candida glabrata LHN 093, Candida krusei LHN 063 and Candida tropicalis LHN 098.
Louis, MO) was tested against three reference Candida strains: Candida albicans ATCC 90028, Candida albicans 24433 and Candida tropicalis ATCC 750.
2,4) Although C albicans is most often responsible for disease in pet birds, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis also have been cultured from lesions in affected birds.
Gross and his team devised a new way to produce these monomers by using a genetically modified strain of Candida tropicalis, one of the many types of yeast that live harmlessly in humans and animals.
Quality control was performed using Candida albicans ATCC 90028 and Candida tropicalis ATCC 750.
In 1 study, Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata were shown to be resistant to fungicides.
Of the 166 patients in the large study who had culture-confirmed esophageal candidiasis at baseline, 120 had Candida albicans and 2 had Candida tropicalis as the sole baseline pathogen whereas 44 had mixed baseline cultures containing C.