cannabinoid

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cannabinoid

[kə′nab·ə‚nȯid]
(organic chemistry)
Any one of the various chemical constituents of cannabis (marijuana), that is, the isomeric tetrahydrocannabinols, cannabinol, and cannabidiol.
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The results of this research will help us to better understand the effects of unique cannabinoid and terpenoid profiles so that we can breed and formulate accurate cannabis medicines for specific conditions," said Revolution Enterprises Chief Operations Officer Dustin Shroyer.
This likely reflects the dearth of high-quality research into the medical usefulness of cannabinoids, wrote Penny F.
The synthetic cannabinoids have been marketed as herbal smoking mixtures under names such as Spice Gold, K2, Kronic and Exodus Damnation.
Marketed as herbal smoking mixtures under names such as Spice Gold, K2, Kronic, and Exodus Damnation, the connecting thread is a large and diverse group of synthetic cannabinoids of varying potencies, which have so far been detected in more than 90 countries.
Synthetic cannabinoids are also known as "K2" or "spice" to users, Baumann says.
Therapix Bio has announced that it has signed a Term Sheet to acquire a privately-owned company involved in the research and development of drug therapies based on synthetic cannabinoid substances, Dekel Pharmaceuticals Ltd.
Cannabinoids in exhaled breath following controlled administration of smoked cannabis.
Researchers are testing cannabinoids as a new family of antitumoral agents.
Synthetic cannabinoids are typically dissolved in a solvent, applied to dried plant material, and smoked out of a bong, bowl, or as a joint.
3] We also have no medications approved by the Medicines Control Council that contain THC, other cannabinoids or even synthetic cannabinoids.
A recent Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report provides information about a series of 22 patients who had been examined after using synthetic cannabinoids between Aug.
The researchers added that though marijuana's "exogenous" cannabinoids also can reduce anxiety, chronic use of the drug down-regulates the receptors, increasing anxiety, which can trigger "a vicious cycle" of increasing marijuana use.