cannonball

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cannonball

1. Tennis
a. a very fast low serve
b. (as modifier): a cannonball serve
2. a jump into water by a person who has his arms tucked into the body to form a ball

cannonball

[′kan·ən‚bȯl]
(ordnance)
A missile that is spheroidal in shape and fired from a cannon.
References in periodicals archive ?
The local administrator, B Krupakar, said: "We will preserve the cannon balls in a room.
A group of French officers shouted insults and stood on the walls raising wine glasses in mock toasts until a cannon ball smashed into them, killing 14.
Some of the pupils were given chance to dress up in military uniform and handle cannon balls.
The big kids were using the little kids as cannon balls and his sister propelled him across the landing into a wall
Captured as an eaglet and named in honor of President Abraham Lincoln, Old Abe braved bullets, shells, and cannon balls, his courage never flagging.
SINNER: Pirates Of The Caribbean Pasta Shapes With Cannon Balls, Heinz, 91 cals per 100g.
KIRKUK / Aswat al-Iraq: An ammunition cache containing cannon balls and mortars has been discovered near Kirkuk City, a local security source said on Sunday.
So Alex explained the meaning of this well known term: In olden days, they needed to keep cannon balls near the cannon on warships without them rolling all over the deck, so they stacked them in a square-based pyramid: one ball on top and 16 at the bottom, making 30 in all.
Guwahati, June 20 (ANI): Residents of Hatisila Village near Guwahati are absolutely elated after the recent archaeological discovery of large number of cannon balls, believed to be of Mughal period.
I remember taking small children to the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich (once only) and all they and every other under-12 child wanted to do was play on a computer where they could fire virtual cannon balls at Napoleon's virtual fleet.
He added extra bits of long wood around it and cannon balls that looked like giant maltesers.
SINCE the 16th Century, the Barley Mow has survived Cromwell's cannon balls, town centre re-development and attempts by a brewery to change its name.