cantaloupe

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cantaloupe:

see gourdgourd
, common name for some members of the Cucurbitaceae, a family of plants whose range includes all tropical and subtropical areas and extends into the temperate zones.
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; melonmelon,
fruit of Cucumis melo, a plant of the family Curcurbitaceae (gourd family) native to Asia and now cultivated extensively in warm regions. There are many varieties, differing in taste, color, and skin texture—e.g.
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cantaloupe

[′kant·əl‚ōp]
(botany)
The fruit (pepo) of Cucumis malo, a small, distinctly netted, round to oval muskmelon of the family Cucurbitaceae in the order Violales.

cantaloupe

, cantaloup
1. a cultivated variety of muskmelon, Cucumis melo cantalupensis, with ribbed warty rind and orange flesh
2. any of several other muskmelons
References in periodicals archive ?
The FDA said the ban would remain in place until Mexico can prove its cantaloupes are grown under sanitary conditions.
A hive of honeybees placed near the cantaloupe patch will increase the yield by 25-50%.
This popular small melon and one called Honeyloupe have quite a bit of cantaloupe bred into them.
The researchers washed cantaloupe rind plugs, which had been inoculated with L.
The melon that Americans call cantaloupe is actually a muskmelon or "netted" melon, not a "true" cantaloupe, which is grown only in Europe.
Current work with Earl Harrison, chair of human nutrition at Ohio State University-Columbus and former research leader of the ARS Phytonutrients Laboratory in Beltsville, Maryland, is comparing the beta-carotene in cantaloupes and orange-fleshed honeydews to that in carrots and sweetpotatoes.
The cantaloupes were distributed for sale in bulk in cardboard cartons, with nine, 12 or 15 melons to a carton.
The researchers inoculated the cantaloupes with [10.
A 2001 survey of imported produce indicates that of 29 cantaloupes from Mexico tested, none yielded Salmonella, Shigella, or Escherichia coli O 157:H7 (FDA, unpublished data, 2001).
California cantaloupes have never been associated with a foodborne illness outbreak.
The netted microscopic surfaces of cantaloupes become safe harboring sites for pathogens by protecting them from washing and sanitizing processes.
It is not surprising that cantaloupes should be prominently displayed in an Italian garden.