Cantus Firmus


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Cantus Firmus

 

a melody borrowed from any secular or religious work or specially created and used as the basis for a polyphonic musical composition. The method of cantus firmus developed in Western European music in the 12th century, became particularly widespread in the 16th, and began losing its importance in the 17th.

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The vast majority of solo movements are in the style of arias that begin with opening ritornellos, and when the voice enters with each line of the hymn text (to a melodic line not necessarily associated with the chorale), the chorale tune eventually emerges from the instrumental ensemble as a cantus firmus.
The additional constraint of improvising against a cantus firmus distinguishes his discussion of canons from that of others--for example, Thomas de Sancta Maria's Libro llamado Arte de taner fantasia (Valladolid: F.
The focus is thus not on Mark Bangert's extraordinary musical ability and contributions but on a particular treasure of the Lutheran tradition that he helped me appreciate more deeply, which seems integral to the cantus firmus of God's love and grace, to which Mark has given witness: The finite is capable of the infinite.
Power transposes the Sarum Gloria V cantus firmus down by a whole step, which results in harmonies on E[flat] at unexpected moments.
Moreover, the composer has chosen as a cantus firmus the first fou r words and the first fourteen notes of the Introit of the Mass of the Dedication of a Church, Terr bills est locus iste, which he disposes in quasi-canonic fashion in the two lower voices in two groups of seven notes.
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 19901, 146-- 47), many cantus firmus masses based on sacred or secular material owe their very existence to the desire of rich individuals to be commemorated in perpetuity through endowments, automatically harnessing the prayers of the assembly for the benefit of the patron's soul, thereby aiding in shortening his or her almost inescapable sojourn in Purgatory.
Some of the works are freely composed, but there are also tenor cantus firmus settings in a conservative style (including a Pater noster /Ave Maria selling in which the tenor part yields two additional canonic voices for a total oI seven parts), and several works in which liturgical melodies for the given an tiphon or sequence are paraphrased in the various polyphonic voice parts (the edition marks out the connections in the score).
notte ("The sweetness and the bitterness of the night"), in which a night watchman's song is treated as a cantus firmus and used as a sod of leitmotif throughout the suite.
In two of the Magnificat cycles (those for tones 3 and 7), Scheidemann omits the last note of the cantus firmus, effectively altering its mode; this supports the view that these settings could not have been used in alternatim performances, with some verses chanted as part of a sung Vespers service.
Around 1510 or 1520, when John Taverner wrote his now-famous parody mass on the popular song "The Westron Wynde," the practice of using a popular melody as the cantus firmus for a Mass settting had yet to gain a real foothold in England, although it was already widespread in continental Europe.
The Hilliard Ensemble's performance of eight French polyphonic pieces from the 12th and 13th centuries serves as the cantus firmus to Aumuller's four-part narrative polyphony.
The use of a cantus firmus as a structural device is in a few cases shown to be an inexact representation as well, since the phrase cantus prius factus is often used in lieu of, or in addition to it in order to describe the various compositional borrowing processes and procedures involving the manipulation of melodic material within works employing either strict or free models.