Capelin


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Capelin

 

(Mallotus villosus), a marine fish of the family Osmeridae. Body length, up to 22 cm; weight, up to 17 g. It inhabits the northern Atlantic Ocean and the Barents, White, and Kara seas. Its subspecies, the Pacific capelin Mallotus v. socialis, is found off Canada and in the Japan, Okhotsk, Bering, Chukchi, and Laptev seas. Capelins are pelagic fish, which move in shoals and feed on planktonic crustaceans. They reach sexual maturity in the second or third year. The female deposits from 6,000 to 40,000 eggs, which are benthic. Spawning occurs on sandy shores or on sandbars. Capelins are commercially valuable.

References in periodicals archive ?
15 m (~1 body length) used by Huse and Toresen (2000) (for herring larvae from Utne-Palm, 2000), the effective volume swept estimated from the observations reported in the present study would imply that the swimming speed of capelin would be very low ([less than or equal to] 1 cm/s) or that fish eggs are not strongly selected as prey during feeding.
Over 24 species, including sand lance, silver hake, Atlantic cod, capelin, and flatfish, were identified from scats collected on Sable Island (Bowen and Harrison, 1994).
Capelin, who was representing himself in court, said he had nothing further to add during yesterday's proceedings.
In the 1980s, pandalid shrimp and capelin were the main food of Pacific cod, whereas benthic species (polychaetes, hermit crabs, Tanner crabs, and eelpouts) were the dominant food in 1995.
and schooling fish species up to 30 cm in length, including capelin (Mallotus villosus), Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi), walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma), Atka mackerel (Pleurogrammus monopterygius), cod (Gadus spp.
They found huge new markets for block-frozen female capelin and herring in the Far East.
In contrast to the situation in the Barents Sea, Iceland reached an amicable accord with the European Union last summer, with the EU agreeing to let Iceland catch up to 30,000 tons of Capelin off Greenland in rerum for the EU being allowed to take up to 3,000 tons of redfish in Icelandic waters.
Temperature was presented as one of several important stimuli affecting fish movements by Harden Jones (1968) and by Wielgolaski (1990), who noticed that capelin (Mallotus villosus), Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), and haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) in the Barents Sea migrate north towards a preferred temperature, either directly to satisfy metabolic requirements, or indirectly, as when attracted by food organisms.
Besides cod, there were declines in capelin (530,950 tons vs.
herring (Clupea pallasi), capelin (Mallotus villosus), eulachon (Thaleichthys pacificus), sand lance (Ammodytes hexapterus), squid, and octopus (Sinclair and Zeppelin, 2002).
Asian consumers generally want capelin -- and production was up 50% last year in that species.