Hugh Capet

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Hugh Capet

(kā`pĭt, kăp`ĭt), c.938–996, king of France (987–96), first of the CapetiansCapetians
, royal house of France that ruled continuously from 987 to 1328; it takes its name from Hugh Capet. Related branches of the family (see Valois; Bourbon) ruled France until the final deposition of the monarchy in the 19th cent.
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. He was the son of Hugh the GreatHugh the Great,
d. 956, French duke; son of King Robert I and father of Hugh Capet. Excluded from the succession on his father's death by his brother-in-law Raoul, he supported the candidacy of Louis IV, the Carolingian heir, after Raoul's death (936).
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, to whose vast territories he succeeded in 956. After the death of Louis VLouis V
(Louis the Sluggard), c.967–987, last French king of the Carolingian dynasty; son of King Lothair. His father had him crowned in 979, but he did not become king until Lothair's death in 986. He was childless and was succeeded by Hugh Capet.
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, last Carolingian king of France, the nobles and prelates elected him king, setting aside the last Carolingian claimant, Charles ICharles I,
953–992?, duke of Lower Lorraine (977–91); younger son of King Louis IV of France. He claimed the French throne when his nephew, Louis V of France, died (987) without issue, but he was set aside in favor of Hugh Capet.
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 of Lower Lorraine. In order to secure the succession, Hugh took as his associate his son Robert (later King Robert IIRobert II
(Robert the Pious), 970–1031, king of France (996–1031); son of Hugh Capet, with whom he was joint king after 987. Distinguished for his piety and learning, he also sought to strengthen the weak royal power, conquered several towns, and secured the duchy of
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); he gave away much of his land to secure the dynasty. He spent much of his reign fighting Charles and later became involved in a controversy with the papacy—unsettled at his death—over deposition of the Carolingian archbishop of Reims.