Capgras syndrome


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Capgras syndrome

[′käp·grəz ‚sin‚drōm]
(psychology)
A delusional misidentification syndrome commonly seen in schizophrenia that causes the individual to replace a familiar person (usually the spouse) with an impostor with the same or similar physical appearance.
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Casebook Capgras syndrome Capgras Syndrome is like waking up in horror film Invasion Of The Bodysnatchers.
The pair focused on a range of rare and bizarre conditions, such as hysterical blindness (where the person cannot see but has no perceptible damage to their eyes or brain), hysterical paralysis (an inability to move a part of the body despite having no physical injury), alien limb syndrome (the feeling that an arm or leg is acting of its own accord), and Capgras Syndrome (a delusional belief that a loved one has been replaced by an imposter).
What Powers has done is cleverly collapsing the history of Capgras Syndrome in a clash between two doctors, as if the controversy were still very much alive today.
Most recently, in The Echo Maker (*** Jan/Feb 2007), he pondered questions of personal identity and reality with the story of a man suffering from Capgras syndrome.
The main clinical characteristics of the Capgras syndrome is a delusional belief that familiar persons are replaced by strangers (2).
Rather, his discussion rushes through Capgras syndrome, Asperger's syndrome, schizophrenia, near-death experiences, and a fictional character in a novel who has religious experiences.
He visits the patient and decides he has Capgras syndrome, i.
We recently cared for a 78 year old man who seemed to develop Capgras syndrome as an adverse reaction to diazepam.
Related to this is the CAPGRAS SYNDROME, in which the patient is convinced that people close to him--family, friends--are quite cleverly dressed and coached but not the real thing.
He awakens with Capgras syndrome, a delusional disorder that prevents him from identifying his older sister, Karin, his caretaker after his accident.
The ex-teacher was awarded pounds 130,000 damages after a judge heard how rare Capgras Syndrome changed him from an outgoing, affectionate husband into someone who doesn't believe his wife exists.
He suffers from a rare condition called Capgras Syndrome, where the victim thinks someone close to them has been replaced by an impostor.