Capgras syndrome


Also found in: Medical.

Capgras syndrome

[′käp·grəz ‚sin‚drōm]
(psychology)
A delusional misidentification syndrome commonly seen in schizophrenia that causes the individual to replace a familiar person (usually the spouse) with an impostor with the same or similar physical appearance.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Neurologists and other researchers from Europe and the US discuss Ganser syndrome; Cotard syndrome; Capgras syndrome and other delusional misidentification syndromes; De Clerambault syndrome, Othello syndrome, Folie C deux, and variants; Couvade syndrome; possessions; conversion, factitious disorder, and malingering; Munchausen syndrome; camptocormia; glossolalia and aphasia; violent behavior; culture-specific hyperstartle-plus syndromes; the dancing manias or mass psychogenic illness; and the Alice-in-Wonderland syndrome.
Knott's pots with Capgras syndrome are only two of the chapter's many delights.
Capgras syndrome (one perceives a familiar person as an imposter)
Besides that, associations of CS with other syndromes are described, such as catatonic syndrome [18], malignant neuroleptic syndrome [19], lycanthropy [20], hydrophobia [21], and capgras syndrome [22, 23].
Following a head injury after he crashes his truck, protagonist Mark Schluter, a 27-year-old meatpacker, develops Capgras Syndrome, a condition characterized primarily by the conviction that others--including his older sister Karin, who leaves her consumer-relations job at a computer company to come home to care for him--are imposters.
Casebook Capgras syndrome Capgras Syndrome is like waking up in horror film Invasion Of The Bodysnatchers.
Other examples include Jonathan Lethem's Motherless Brooklyn (1999), in which the protagonist has Tourette's syndrome; Mark Haddon's Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (2003), narrated by an autistic teenager; and Rivka Galchen's Atmospheric Disturbances (2008), about a man who suffers from Capgras syndrome and stops recognizing his wife.
The pair focused on a range of rare and bizarre conditions, such as hysterical blindness (where the person cannot see but has no perceptible damage to their eyes or brain), hysterical paralysis (an inability to move a part of the body despite having no physical injury), alien limb syndrome (the feeling that an arm or leg is acting of its own accord), and Capgras Syndrome (a delusional belief that a loved one has been replaced by an imposter).
What Powers has done is cleverly collapsing the history of Capgras Syndrome in a clash between two doctors, as if the controversy were still very much alive today.
Most recently, in The Echo Maker (*** Jan/Feb 2007), he pondered questions of personal identity and reality with the story of a man suffering from Capgras syndrome.
The main clinical characteristics of the Capgras syndrome is a delusional belief that familiar persons are replaced by strangers (2).
Rather, his discussion rushes through Capgras syndrome, Asperger's syndrome, schizophrenia, near-death experiences, and a fictional character in a novel who has religious experiences.