capillary wave

(redirected from Capillary waves)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

capillary wave

[′kap·ə‚ler·ē ‚wāv]
(fluid mechanics)
A wave occurring at the interface between two fluids, such as the interface between air and water on oceans and lakes, in which the principal restoring force is controlled by surface tension.
A water wave of less than 1.7 centimeters. Also known as capillary ripple; ripple.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thermal capillary waves cause fluid droplets to coalesce with a fluid substrate by film drainage at the interface, breakage of the film, and intrusion of the particle into the bulk phase (Aarts et al.
In addition, particle diffusion and uptake promoted by thermal capillary waves might play a role in particle transport through membranes.
In the ECWD technique, surface capillary waves in the frequency range of 0.
0] and the corresponding wave damping coefficient [Beta] for the capillary waves produced are determined by measuring the optical diffraction of a laser beam positioned at various distances from the source needle.