Grozny

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Related to Capital of Chechnya: Chechen Republic, Kicking Horse River

Grozny

or

Groznyy

(both: grôz`nē), city (2006 est. pop. 230,000), capital of ChechnyaChechnya
or Chechen Republic
, republic (1990 est. pop. 1,300,000, with neighboring Ingushetia), c.6,100 sq mi (15,800 sq km), SE European Russia, in the N Caucasus. Grozny is the capital. Prior to 1992 Chechnya and Ingushetia comprised the Checheno-Ingush Republic.
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, SE European Russia, in the northern foothills of the Greater Caucasus. It is the center of Chechnya's oil fields, linked by pipelines to Makhachkala on the Caspian Sea, to Tuapse on the Black Sea, and to Horlivka in Ukraine. One of Russia's oldest oil-producing areas (production began in 1893), Grozny was a major strategic goal of invading German armies in World War II. Soviet troops halted the German advance just short of the city. Fighting between the Russian army and Chechen separatists devastated the city in the mid-1990s and again in 1999, and the resulting bloodshed, destruction, and lawlessness led roughly three quarters of the residents to flee. A decade later, however, the city had undergone extensive reconstruction, and the population had returned to near pre-conflict levels.

Grozny

a city in S Russia, capital of the Chechen Republic: a major oil centre: it was badly damaged during fighting between separatists and Russian troops (1994--95, 1999--2000). Pop.: 199 000 (2005 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
By autumn 2000, the Russians had to acknowledge that even in Gudermes, the de facto Russian capital of Chechnya, they were unable to control the situation.
Lebed promised to return to Grozny, the capital of Chechnya, later this week.
In the last days of November, 1994, the rival group entered into Grozny, the capital of Chechnya with Russian arms and equipments.
Two years ago, as vicious urban fighting blundered around Grozny, the capital of Chechnya, about 180,000 regular folk lost their homes to artillery fire, their possessions, their jobs and their families.