capital ship

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capital ship

[′kap·ət·əl ′ship]
(naval architecture)
A surface warship classified as major, for example, a battleship or aircraft carrier.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 1922 Washington Naval Treaty was based on the ratio of capital ships of the principal naval powers of the era.
If Germany dropped this annual contingent of ships from its program, Britain would "blot out" the corresponding five capital ships it planned to start that year.
Hughes discusses the matter in generally tactical terms (which can have strategic implications when capital ships are involved), but there are additional permutations at the operational and strategic levels.
The key question is thus whether American voice and influence can be transmitted in ways other than through the movements of its capital ships, the large aircraft carriers.
Capital ships of the battle fleet have been inefficient at or incapable of defending "trade," even after establishing unchallenged command of the seas.
When nations commit their capital ships to a battle, it is generally for command of the sea, having achieved which, by virtue of defeating and seriously weakening the opponent's main fleet, a force may use the seas for its own strategic purposes.
Aircraft of the day lacked the payload to do serious damage to capital ships.
In Fisher's plan the sea-denial strategy protected the center, releasing large capital ships for a more active defense of the vulnerable periphery and the vital trade routes across the global commons.
assigning to capital ships tasks for which the), proved quite unsuitable
Almost from the time the echo of the guns in the North Sea faded, naval strategy shifted to things radically different from decisive battles between capital ships.
As the author notes, the gunnery proficiency of British capital ships actually decreased through much of the interwar period, due in large part to budgetary restrictions and the problems of assimilating new technology.
In "Connecting the Dots: Capital Ships, the Littoral, Command of the Sea, and the World Order," Robert C.