capital ship

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capital ship

[′kap·ət·əl ′ship]
(naval architecture)
A surface warship classified as major, for example, a battleship or aircraft carrier.
References in periodicals archive ?
Groaning under the burden of high naval expenditures, in 1912 both governments tried again to come to an agreement that they hoped would reduce the building rates of capital ships.
But for Canada to possess an independent strategic strike capability, she needs a capital ship.
Although two new aircraft-carriers will probably be built, without planes, there will be a gap of several years when Britain will not have a single capital ship.
Saratoga and sister ship USS Lexington (CV 2) were the world's largest aircraft carriers until late in World War II and the "Sara" was the world's fastest capital ship of her era, reaching 34.
The tin cans hunted German U-Boats and Japanese submarines, rescued downed navy pilots from the sea, lent their five-inch guns to shore bombardments, served as fast-moving anti-aircraft gun platforms in defense of capital ships, and even delivered fuel and supplies in emergencies.
ESE is designed as a single-unit replacement for the existing SLQ-32(V) signal processing elements and will be installed on the majority of Navy capital ships.
The decision to send two capital ships to engage the Japanese without an attendant aircraft carrier was Churchill's, taken against the views of naval chiefs.
The fact that they hit one of the German cruisers during the course of the battle ultimately sealed the demise of the German capital ships for the rest of the war.
While this book stands well alone, it is really the concluding volume of Massie's earlier Dreadnought, and thus focuses on the role of the capital ships.
Bowman equipment is planned to be fitted to approximately 20,000 vehicles (from Land Rover Wolf to the Challenger 2 main battle tank), 160 ships (the Royal Navy's five capital ships, the frigate and destroyer fleet, and some 100 auxilliary naval vessels), and a number of aircraft (the major helicopter types supporting land operations: Chinook, Merlin, and Lynx), and will be used by 70,000 servicemen.
Admirals have sometimes been criticized for hoarding their capital ships to maintain the fleet in being, rather than risk it, though Admiral Chester Nimitz at Midway in 1942 provides a striking counter-example.