Capitoline Hill

(redirected from Capitolium)

Capitoline Hill

(kăp`ĭtəlīn') or

Capitol,

highest of the seven hills of ancient Rome, historic and religious center of the city. The great temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, on its southern summit, was dedicated in 509 B.C.; it was foremost among the temples and altars of Rome. Destroyed three times by fire, it was last rebuilt by the emperor Domitian. On the northern summit of the Capitol was the citadel (arx). On the side overlooking the Forum stood the Tabularium, where the state archives were kept. Until the 1st cent. A.D., state criminals were hurled to their death from the Tarpeian Rock, on the steep south face of the hill. In the Middle Ages the Capitol remained the political center of Rome. The center of municipal government in modern Rome is on the same location. In the 16th cent. Michelangelo designed the present plan. A flight of steps leads to the square on top of the hill; on one side of the square is the Palazzo dei Conservatori, on the other, the Capitoline Museum. Both buildings now house collections of antiquities. In the center of the square is the ancient equestrian bronze statue of Emperor Marcus Aurelius.
References in periodicals archive ?
In ancient Rome this place was known as Capitolium, in English the Capitol.
In Dougga, such a stele would have provided an irresistible association with the city's own Capitolium, with its eagle-borne apotheosis of Antoninus Pius (fig.
Newly excavated fragments of architectural decoration contribute to the clearer understanding of the important imperial temples in the civic and provincial fora of Augusta Emerita (Nogales Basarrate) and Tarraco (Pensabene) in Spain, while the careful study of the Augustan Capitolium at Pozzuoli (Zevi and Cavalieri Manasse), remarkably preserved in the city's ancient cathedral, reveals a wholly exceptional structure built of solid marble, reflecting the wealth of this key commercial port.
At the time of the colonial foundation the Romans had levelled the hilltop to create a massive, steeply elevated platform some 30,000 square metres in size on which were placed a cluster of quintessentially Roman buildings: a vast, dominating colonnaded forum, a grand judicial basilica, and two great temples, one most likely a Capitolium, the other perhaps intended for the imperial cult.
Degrassi, 'Le sistemazioni del Fasti Capitolini', Capitolium, vol.
Alberti seems to have surveyed the city by "triangulation" from a number of points, not just from the central Capitolium.
He received the John Price Wetherill Medal from the Franklin Institute, the IEEE/LEOS William Streifer Award, the Technology and Innovation Award from Industry Week Magazine, the Materials Research Society Medal, the Newcomb Cleveland Prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the LMVH "Vinci of Excellence" Prize, the Heinrich Welker Memorial Medal from Siemens, the Popular Science Award for Science and Technology, the New York Academy of Sciences Award, the IEEE David Sarnoff Award in Electronics, the Bell Labs Distinguished Member of Technical Staff and Bell Labs Fellows Awards, the Award of Excellence of the Society for Technical Communications, and the Premio Capitolium Award from the City of Rome.