Capparis


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Capparis

 

a genus of plants of the family Capparidaceae. It includes trees, bushes, or perennial grasses, sometimes with thorns (modified stipules). There are between 250 and 300 known species, primarily tropical and subtropical varieties; they often grow in arid regions.

In the USSR there are two species. The most economically important species in Eurasia is the caperbush (C. spinosa), a perennial subshrub. Its leaves are rounded, with spiny stipules. The flowers are large, white or pale rose, with numerous stamens; the ovary is on a gynophore. The fruit is a pod-shaped berry with a reddish pulp. This species is found primarily in the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, and India. In the Soviet Union it grows in the southern Crimea, the Caucasus (except for the mountainous and damp areas), and Middle Asia. The caper-bush is cultivated in Western and Southern Europe, India, the Philippines, North Africa (Morocco), and North America. In the USSR, wild caperbushes are used commercially in the Dagestan ASSR. In Western Europe the variety C. spinosa var. genuina (without thorns) produces between 500 g and 3 kg of fruit from a single plant. The flower buds, young fruits, and the tips of shoots are marinated in vinegar and pickled; they are then used as a condiment for sauces and soups. Ripe fruits are also used in dry form. They contain approximately 18 percent protein. The seeds have up to 30 percent fat, while the buds have 0.32 percent rutin. These plants contain the alkaloid capparidin. They are also nectar-bearing.

References in periodicals archive ?
Plants so far studied showing insecticidal or repellent effect to sandflies are Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae) (41-42), Solanum jasminoides (Solanaceae), Bougainvillea glabra (Nyctaginaceae) (41), Capparis spinosa (Capparidaceae) (41-42), Solanum luteum (Solanaceae), Malva nicaeensis (Malvaceae) (42), Tagetes minuta Linnaeus (Asteraceae), Acalypha fruticosa Forssk (Euphorbiaceae), Tarchonanthus camphoratus L.
Antihepatotoxic activity of p-methoxy benzoic acid from Capparis spinosa.
Demsmostachya bipinnata Kohistan Trees/Shrubs: Acacia nilotica, Acacia ranges Senegal, Bacteria acanthoides, Catotropis procera, Capparis aphylla, Commiphora wrightii, Commiphora stocksiana, Cordia gharaf, Euphorbia caducifolia, Grewia villosa, Leptadenia pyrotehnica, Lycium depressum, Pterophyllum oliverai, Prosopis cineraria, Ryazya stricta Salvadora oleoides, Tumarix dioca, Tecoma undulata, Grasses: Aristida adescensionis, Aristida mutabilis, Cenchrus ciliaris Cenchrus Biflorus, Cenchrus pennisetiformis, Cynodon dactylon, Cymbopogon jwarancusa, Digitaria sp.
Species Division Class 1 Capparis cartilaginea Spermatophyta Angiospermae a e 2 Capparis sinaica 3 Dipterygium glaucum 4 Farsetia longisiliqua 5 Citrullus colocynthis 6 Peganum harmala 7 Haplophyllum tuberculatum 8 Spergula falax 9 Robbairea deliliana 10 Hammada elegans 11 Acacia tortilis 12 Casia italica 13 Alhagi maurorum 14 Astragalus annularis 15 Tephrosia apollinea 16 Rhaziz stricta 17 Calotropis procera 18 Convolovulus desertii 19 Heliotropium supinum 20 Heliotropium digynum 21 Achillea santolina 22 Echinops spinosissimus 23 Francoeuria crispa 24 Setaria verticillata 25 Juncus rigidus No.
A CAPER is the flower bud of the Capparis Spinosa bush found in the Mediterranean and parts of Asia.
Antiestrogenic constituents of the Thai medicinal plants Capparis flavicans and Vitex glabrata.
In more extreme cases the nectary is one-sided (Capparaceae; Capparis, Euadenia, Cadaba; Kers, 2003), or the androecium is unequal (Cleomaceae; Cleome, Dactylaena, Polanisia; Endress, 1992).
Free Radical, Metal-chelating and Antibacterial Activities of Methonolic Extract of Capparis Spinosa buds.
Name of the herb Parts used Quantity Extracts of Capparis spinosa Root 49 mg Cichorium intybus Seed 49 mg Solanum nigrum Whole plant 25 mg Terminalia arjuna Bark 25 mg Cassia occidentals Seed 13 mg Achillea millefolium Aerial part 13 mg Tamarix gallica Whole plant 13 mg
The positive correlation with the Bananaquit and the shrub/ tree Capparis hastate (Capparaceae) might reflect nectarivory, whereas that with the Black-faced Grassquit is unlikely to be related to feeding, as seeds of C.
The dominant vegetation in these areas is Prosopis juliflora (considered as a weed in the Park and several other parts of India), Acacia nilotica, and species of Salvadora, Capparis, and Zizyphus.
This invincible plant is the caper bush, Capparis spinosa.