Miridae

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Related to Capsid bug: plant bug

Miridae

[′mir·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The largest family of the Hemiptera; included in the Cimicomorpha, it contains herbivorous and predacious plant bugs which lack ocelli and have a cuneus and four-segmented antennae.

Miridae

 

(leaf bugs), a family of true bugs. Leaf bugs are 3–10 mm long and vary in color from straw-yellow or green to reddish brown or black. Sometimes there are markings: black stripes and dots on a light background or yellow or whitish stripes and dots on a black background. The antennae are usually longer than the head. The proboscis has four segments. The ocelli are wanting, but the wings are usually developed. There is an ovipositor. The leaf bugs are represented by a large number of cosmopolitan species. There are about 700 species in the USSR. The insects are herbivores or, less commonly, carnivores or omnivores. They inhabit herbaceous plants and trees. Crop pests include the alfalfa bug (Adelphocoris lineolatus) and the beet bug (Poeciloscytux cognatus).

References in periodicals archive ?
Answer: The apples have probably been attacked by apple sawfly or capsid bugs.
THE corky lumps could have been caused by capsid bugs but without a doubt your apples have been affected by the scab disease which damages apples and pears.
Capsid bugs can be a bit of a problem but if it is not a common pest in your garden or you can keep them under control, then I.
Take your pick from slugs, snails, carrot fly, blackfly, greenfly, white fly, cushion scale, leather jackets, wireworm, vine weevil, lily beetle, aphids, capsid bugs, caterpillars, harlequin ladybirds and New Zealand flatworms.
ADRIENNE SAYS: Most likely culprits are capsid bugs.