capture

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capture

1. Physics a process by which an atom, molecule, ion, or nucleus acquires an additional particle
2. Geography the process by which the headwaters of one river are diverted into another through erosion caused by the second river's tributaries
3. Computing the act or process of inserting or transferring data into a computer

capture

[′kap·chər]
(aerospace engineering)
The process in which a missile is taken under control by the guidance system.
(astrophysics)
Of a central force field, as of a planet, to overcome by gravitational force the velocity of a passing body and bring the body under the control of the central force field, in some cases absorbing its mass.
(geochemistry)
In a crystal structure, the substitution of a trace element for a lower-valence common element.
(hydrology)
The natural diversion of the headwaters of one stream into the channel of another stream having greater erosional activity and flowing at a lower level. Also known as piracy; river capture; river piracy; robbery; stream capture; stream piracy; stream robbery.
(physics)
A process in which an atomic or nuclear system acquires an additional particle; for example, the capture of electrons by positive ions, or capture of neutrons by nuclei.

capture

i. In flying aircraft, to control aircraft trajectory to intercept and then follow an external radio beam (as in ILS, or instrument landing system).
ii. To detect and lock onto a target by a radar.
iii. In flying, to reach a desired altitude or direction, especially using an autopilot or automatic flight control system.

capture

To acquire text, images, audio and video in their original format. Once captured in the computer, the data are typically edited and converted into another format. See frame grabber, video capture board and screen capture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Drawing upon the historical and theoretical insights of Part I, this Part evaluates how technological changes reshape contemporary capture theory.
However, the bootleggers and Baptists variation on Capture Theory is a reminder that socially undesirable results can emanate from unlikely collaborations between different, and sometimes very diverse, interest groups.
practice can be based upon capture theory, it must be because local legislative bodies, and subfederal judicial and regulatory institutions, are more susceptible to capture than a state legislature would be.
The codon capture theory follows almost immediately.
What have the capture theory proponents advocated as alternatives to traditional regulation?
In this case, however, the desire of the auditors prevailed over that of the users, consistent with capture theory.
Hovenkamp shows, for example, how interest-group politics and the capture theory cannot explain railroad regulation.
Stigler's capture theory is re-examined as a special case of the multi-interest group regulatory model advocated by Meier.