Caratacus


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Caratacus

, Caractacus, Caradoc
died ?54 ad, British chieftain: led an unsuccessful resistance against the Romans (43--50)
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References in periodicals archive ?
XII, 36, 3: Ceterorum preces degeneres fuere ex nietu: at non Caratacus aut vultu demisso aut verbis misericordiani requirens, ubi tribunali adstitit, in huuc modum locutus est.
Caratacus is thought to have used the Carmarthenshire hill fort of Garn Goch near Llangadog in Eastern Carmarthenshire as one of his bases.
But when Caratacus was finally caught (and pardoned in Rome after his impassioned speech impressed Emperor Claudius) the Roman influence took hold and they would stay for around 400 years.
If we take into account evidence like the distribution of coins, there is every indication that one of the main leaders of Catuvellaunian expansion was a son of the powerful king Cunobelinus, Caratacus.
The name is spelled in various ways: Caratacus, Caractacus or, in Welsh, Caradog.
Classical writers like Cassius Dio and Cornelius Tacitus leave little doubt that the resistance was, in large part, orchestrated by Caratacus.
Initially one of their leaders was Caratacus (Caradog), a prince of the Catuvellauni, the most powerful tribe in what is today south-east England.
Gw r o Essex oedd Caratacus, ond wedi iddo arwain llwyth rhyfelgar o dde-ddwyrain Cymru fe gafodd ei fabwysiadu fel arwr Cymreig, o dan yr enw Caradog.
Their chieftain, Caratacus, whom some have since said most closely resembles legendary Welsh warrior Caradog in history, had set his face against Roman rule.
Vespasian pushed west into England, and the task of capturing Caratacus and subduing Wales was handed to the new governor of Britain, Ostorius Scapula, who began his campaign in 47AD.
The resistance was orchestrated by the charismatic leader the Romans knew as Caratacus and the Welsh as Caradog.
Their leader was Caradog who they called Caratacus, a prince of the Catuvellauni of Essex who had been exiled by the Romans.