Carausius


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Carausius

(kərôsh`ēəs), d. 293, Gallo-Roman military commander. He was stationed in Gaul, but Emperor MaximianMaximian
(Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus) , d. 310, Roman emperor, with Diocletian (286–305). An able commander, he was made caesar (subemperor) by Diocletian in 285 and augustus in 286.
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 suspected him of conspiring with the Germans and condemned him to death. Carausius fled to Britain and established his rule there, defying attempts to conquer him. Diocletian and Maximian finally recognized (c.289) him as coemperor, and he established his rule in NE Gaul as well as in Britain. In 293, however, Constantius (later Constantius I) defeated him, and he was murdered by one of his own men.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two-Eight-Six is set in 286AD when Roman usurper Mausaeus Carausius seized power in Britain, and also in the near future when two Newcastle lawyers set off to compete in an Italian road race in a car numbered 286.
It's called the Forgotten Emperor and tells the story of Carausius who became emperor in 286 and was assassinated seven years later.
He's finishing work on a historical novel about Carausius, a third-century Roman admiral who ruled Britain for seven years.
It includes hundreds of coins bearing the image of Marcus Aurelius Carausius, who seized power in Britain and northern France in the late third century and proclaimed himself emperor.
Among the revelations on the lance head (or contos head) is that the real King Arthur may have been Marcus Aurelius Mausaeus Carausius, a 3rd century Belgic sailor from humble origins who rose up through the ranks to eventually become a Rogue Emperor of Rome.
Then a naval commander called Carausius established himself as emperor in Britain and northern Gaul, and remained in power until he was murdered.
John Newman, of Suffolk County Council's Archaeological Service, said the treasure, which would originally have been adorned with a silver wash, was of the usurper emperors Carausius (287-293 AD) and Allectus (293-296 AD).
Hammerson identifies the large number of coins of the usurper Emperors Carausius and Allectus as 'one of the site's most distinguishing features' (p.
Influence of cosmic radiation and/or microgravity on development of Carausius morosus.
It is Britain's biggest discovery of Roman coins and dates back to forgotten emperor Carausius who ruled here from AD286 to AD293.
The Fund concentrates on art, but 11 groups of objects can be broadly classified as archaeological: the Haynes hoard of Late Roman coinage and jewellery (Bedford Museum), the Appledore hoard (British Museum), an aureus of the Roman emperor Septimius Severus (British Museum), a denarius of the Roman emperor Carausius (British Museum), the Buckingham coin hoard (Buckinghamshire County Museum), the South Cerney harness mount (Cirencester Museum), 13 Medieval floor tiles (Devizes Museum), the Little Smeaton hoard (Doncaster Museum), a Runic shilling (Fitzwilliam Museum), four Anglo-Saxon pennies (Exeter Museum) and a prehistoric stone ball from Eden Valley, North Cumbria.
On the south coast, Portchester and Pevensey provide examples of the late Roman defensive architecture at its most developed (Figure 2): Portchester has recently been dated by the find of a coin of Carausius in the construction levels to after 286 (Cunliffe 1975: 41), while Pevensey has been regarded as the latest of the group.