Caravaggio


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Caravaggio

Michelangelo Merisi da . 1571--1610, Italian painter, noted for his realistic depiction of religious subjects and for his dramatic use of chiaroscuro.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caravaggio's Raising of Lazarus (Messina Museo Regionale, 1609) is more an exhumation than a joyous resurrection, as if Lazarus, shrivelled to his bones (so that his dangling arm looks like one of Leonardo's anatomical drawings) reluctantly strains to return to this world, of which Caravaggio himself must have been weary, only at the enforcing command of Christ.
But if Caravaggio was believed by his detractors to have simply copied the flaws and quirks of nature without editing, Annibale was perceived--just as mistakenly--as having created, exclusively through the exercise of his intellect, a convincing world free of the irregularities of actuality.
Moreover, unlike many of his followers Caravaggio painted from life, and did so with a skill that was intuitive rather than learned or pedantic.
Lead poisoning on its own is unlikely to kill you, but it can induce violent behaviour, a well known trait of Caravaggio.
They have dug up and studied bones found in the Tuscan town where Caravaggio died in 1610.
And I'm particularly interested in the fact that Caravaggio, who is a painter Vittorio has referenced very often in his lectures and writing, would be the subject of the film we saw tonight.
Although the book's title names only Caravaggio, Guercino, and Mattia Preti, many other artists working in the half-figure format are also discussed.
Caravaggio was revolutionary in his time for the realism of his religious paintings.
Always exhilarated by the life of the streets, Caravaggio progressed from fruit-pieces to pictures of disreputable youths with heaps of fruit, minions half-clad in slipping or gaping silk shirts, dusky as the pomegranates, figs and black grapes they pretend to sell, and as saleable; doubtlessly a desirable equation in the eyes of Caravaggio and the late-Renaissance Cardinals who solicited his pictures.
This meant plenty of work for young artists such as 21-year-old Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio and the legion of extraordinary young artists who followed in his painterly footsteps.
that Caravaggio found a follower of talent"--of such talent that Sterling called him the most original painter of still life in seventeenth-century Italy.
Most of this new material should be familiar to Caravaggio scholars, and the scope of the book is undoubtedly exoteric.