carbon fixation

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carbon fixation

[′kär·bən fik¦sā·shən]
(cell and molecular biology)
During photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert carbon dioxide from the air into organic molecules.
References in periodicals archive ?
This means that under salinity, the leaf production rate of cassava was lower than the abscission rate, which determined the smaller carbon assimilation areas; this is a negative aspect for plants growing under salt stress.
Photosynthetic carbon assimilation and associated metabolism in relation to water deficits in higher plants.
The net carbon assimilation rate (A), stomatal conductance (gs), and leaf internal CO2 automatically calculated.
Restoration practices to optimize carbon assimilation rates, while protecting biodiversity and aesthetic attractiveness, could include selective harvest of wood products from old woodlands and conversion of shrubby fields to native tall grass prairie.
A simulation model is a series of interacting mathematical formulas based on theories of how something behaves: a chemical process like carbon assimilation, or how a vine grows in terms of its leaf area and its distribution.
GLcB is an enzyme that catalyses carbon assimilation by the glyoxylate shunt pathway [6] and seems to be involved in M.
But more importantly, it has the potential to leave more carbon dioxide, ranked as the first strongest greenhouse gas, in the atmosphere by decreasing carbon assimilation in trees.
A separate measure of total carbon assimilation per each class was not made for this study because total carbon abundance was too high for the mass spectrometer to measure.
Louis, MO) has patented nucleic acid sequences from plant cells, in particular, nucleic acid sequences from maize and soybean associated with the carbon assimilation pathway enzymes.
We hypothesized that carbon assimilation and allocation will be affected by flooding regimes, with a general shift toward reduction in belowground:aboveground ratios of production.
Carbon assimilation tests were performed on 112 random isolates using a simplified panel of carbon sources (histamine, histidine, citrate, malonate, trans-aconitate, phenylalanine, DL-4 aminobutyrate) (2).