carbonate rock

(redirected from Carbonate rocks)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

carbonate rock

[′kär·bə·nət ′räk]
(petrology)
A rock composed principally of carbonates, especially if at least 50% by weight.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ordovician, Silurian, and Devonian carbonate rocks of Estonia show a rather unique preservation of primary sedimentary and biogenic structures.
This classification uses mineralogic, geochemical, and hydrogeologic criteria from clastic and carbonate rocks, the occurrence of hydrocarbons, and fractures.
Red coloration of carbonate rocks (dolostones and marlstones) may by of early diagenetic origin before dolomitization, but iron pigmentation was redistributed also in the later diagenetic stages.
Charles to Kansas City, crossing notable karst in Ordovician and Mississippian carbonate rocks, into Pennsylvanian strata that is primarily clastic sediments with few karst features.
A mineral such as gypsum would have come into existence in an aqueous environment as would carbonate rocks.
monax may have a calcium/magnesium deficiency which could be compensated for by gnawing carbonate rocks.
Petrophysical changes caused by dolomitization and leaching in fracture zones of lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks, North Estonia // Nordic Petroleum Technology Series: One.
For typical carbonate rocks, with smallest calcite or dolomite crystallite sizes of [10.
The sedimentary rock-hosted deposits are divided into those hosted by a) metamorphic sequences, b) black shales and carbonates, and c) sedimentary and carbonate rocks.
Some areas studied are medium P/T metamorphism in a subduction zone, computational simulation of geological phenomena using particle simulation methods, fault-related carbonate rocks and earthquake indicators, and the tectonic relationship between the course change of the Yangtze River and the Indo-Asia Collision.
carbonate rocks, it has become a milestone as far the oil and gas industry in Oman is concerned.
Carbonate rocks are extremely reactive and are readily replaced by fluorite when contacted by solutions high in fluorine.