carburetor icing

(redirected from Carburetor ice)

carburetor icing

[′kär·bə‚red·ər ‚ī·siŋ]
(mechanical engineering)
The formation of ice in an engine carburetor as a consequence of expansive cooling and evaporation of gasoline.

carburetor icing

carburetor icingclick for a larger image
The most common form of engine icing, which is caused by a sudden drop in temperature resulting from vaporization of the fuel and adiabatic cooling following the pressure reduction as the air accelerates through the venturi of the carburetor. The ice gradually builds up and blocks the venturi, upsetting the fuel-air mixture and resulting in a loss of power.
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, the pilot believed that he had experienced carburetor ice.
The pilot was surprised that the carburetor ice took so long to clear.
The FAA carburetor icing probability chart indicated the airplane was operating in an area associated with a serious risk of carburetor ice formation at glide power settings.
There are six primary aviation weather hazards: thunderstorms, turbulence, reduced visibility near the surface, strong surface winds, carburetor ice and airframe ice.
We don't usually think of carburetor ice as an aviation weather hazard.
We've all been told one of the advantages of fuel injection is eliminating the possibility of carburetor ice.
Let's say you've done the red-box/bold items: enrichening the mixture (or leaning it if that didn't work), turning on carburetor heat to eliminate carburetor ice, turning on the boost pump to increase or restore fuel pressure to the system, and changing to the fuller tank.
As the cold, dry winter is replaced by the more-humid air of summer, we're back in the season for one type of induction icing, carburetor ice.
I can almost hear you now, saying, "I think he means carburetor ice.
As a primary student somewhat familiar with engines and other mechanical contrivances, one of the aviation-centric concepts I found challenging involved carburetor ice.
But the less-than-enthusiastic takeoff from Phoenix due to our weight, combined with the carburetor ice encounters, left us with serious doubts about attempting Leadville even under ideal conditions.
Carburetor ice forms when humid air cools to freezing as it passes through the venturi near the throttle plate.