cardiac arrhythmia

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Related to Cardiac dysrhythmias: arrhythmia, cardiac arrhythmia, ventricular arrhythmia

cardiac arrhythmia

[¦kärd·ē‚ak ā′rith·mē·ə]
(medicine)
Any disturbance or irregularity of the heartbeat.
References in periodicals archive ?
max] at either lag 0 or 1 has a significant association with all cardiovascular diseases except for cardiac dysrhythmias.
When such diets are followed without supplementation, alterations of electrolytes, minerals, and trace elements may result in Q-T prolongation and the potential for cardiac dysrhythmias.
The most frequent CV diagnoses observed were hypertension (48%), cardiac dysrhythmias (9.
Discovery has two technology platforms: one based on dopamine for the treatment of movement disorders and the other on adenosine for the treatment and diagnosis of coronary artery disease and cardiac dysrhythmias.
These include Vitamin D intoxication, which is clinically associated with hypercalcemia and can result in neurological muscular disorders, calcification of soft tissues, and in some cases cardiac dysrhythmias.
Beta-blockers, such as atenolol (Tenormin) and propranolol (Inderal), are used to treat hypertension, cardiac dysrhythmias and angina, as well as migraine and essential tremor.
Defibrillators: electrical devices that deliver therapeutic levels of energy to the heart muscle for the treatment of ventricular defibrillation, cardiac dysrhythmias, and pulseless ventricular tachycardia.
Also, Pour Memari's (1995) research on" the effect of applying Benson relaxation on anxiety and cardiac dysrhythmias of cardiac catheterization showed breathing rate increased in patients of control group in the second investigation [15].
27) Myocardial shape changes and the possible resultant remodeling have also been implicated in the development of cardiac dysrhythmias.
However, the actual effect of this class of drugs has been shown, repeatedly, to increase adverse outcomes for patients--increasing myocardial oxygen demand, development of cardiac dysrhythmias and mortality.
This evolved into the Milner Acetylcholine Protocol (MAP) for management of cardiac dysrhythmias.
Symptoms and signs of increased sympathetic activity include hypertension, tachycardia, cardiac dysrhythmias, increased perspiration, fever, hyperglycaemia and restlessness.