pulmonary edema

(redirected from Cardiogenic pulmonary edema)
Also found in: Medical.

pulmonary edema

[′pu̇l·mə‚ner·ē i′dē·mə]
(medicine)
An effusion of fluid into the alveoli and interstitial spaces of the lungs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The absence of cardiomegaly and pleural effusion radiographically distinguishes ARDS from cardiogenic pulmonary edema.
Reappraisal of continuous positive airway pressure therapy in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema.
Treatment of severe cardiogenic pulmonary edema with continuous positive airway pressure delivered by face mask.
Cytarabine induced non cardiogenic pulmonary edema in a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, lnt J Lab Hem 2007;29: 482-3.
Randomized, prospective trial of oxygen, continuous positive airway pressure, and bilevel positive airway pressure by face mask in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema.
Comparison of brain natriuretic peptide and probrain natriuretic peptide in the diagnosis of cardiogenic pulmonary edema in patients aged 65 and older.
MONTREAL -- The most common emergency department treatments for cardiogenic pulmonary edema actually make the condition worse and should be abandoned in favor of aggressive, high-dose nitroglycerin combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, Amal Mattu, M.
In other words, no lung disease causes a CO2 diffusion impairment problem, similar that seen with O2, for example, cardiogenic pulmonary edema and pulmonary fibrosis.
The white out could indicate the development of acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome but the elevated CVP along with the hypotension and increase hilar markings is highly indicative of cardiogenic pulmonary edema secondary to CHF.
The term high-pressure pulmonary edema is used to describe cardiogenic pulmonary edema because the transudation of fluid into the air spaces of the lungs is caused by increased pulmonary capillary hydrostatic pressure secondary to elevated pulmonary venous pressure.
It is not uncommon for NPE to be initially misdiagnosed as a cardiovascular complication or cardiogenic pulmonary edema associated with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or a variety of central nervous system insults.
The classic chest radiograph reveals bilateral, diffuse alveolar infiltrates consistent with alveolar flooding The absence of cardiomegaly and pleural effusion radiographically distinguishes ARDS from cardiogenic pulmonary edema.