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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, he recommended promoting more equitable payment for medical care of people on Old Age Assistance: "In some states compensation to institutions is at a level which is commensurate with costs of services.
It is obvious from these accounts written during the 1950s that, while long-term care still had some problems in terms of standardization and regulation, at least those concerned with the care of the elderly and disabled were getting their message out: that it was becoming less and less acceptable to simply park the elderly wherever a bed could be found and call it "caring.
In contrast, specialists tend to have more knowledge in their specialty area, are more likely to use up-to-date and effective treatments, and often have better outcomes when taking care of patients within their specialty, particularly those who have acute, serious illnesses.
The goal of these studies is to obtain information and knowledge about variations in the outcomes of care of members that can lead to improvements in the processes of care.
This new institution had a problem: How to regulate three groups of practitioners--physicians, surgeons, and apothecaries--who were, for the first time, working together in one place in the care of patients.
The minority recommends that government competition in the practice of medicine be discontinued and that its activities be restricted a) to the care of the indigent and of those patients with diseases which can be cared for only in governmental institutions; b) to the promotion of public health.
California, Louisiana, Maine, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, South Carolina Vermont, and Washington) have implemented health care reform initiatives that may help improve the health care of persons with disabilities (Watson, Eilenberg, & Odulana, 1995).
The Governor's plan is commendable and right on - making the health care of fellow Pennsylvanians his top priority," said Hal Rosenbluth, Chairman of Take Care Health Systems.
The managed care movement has not only influenced the care of the membership it has attracted over the years, but has also affected the care of all Americans through a multitude of health care delivery breakthroughs and applications.
1985 Alzheimer's Association partnered with American Health Care Association to write a manual, Care of Alzheimer's Patients: A Manual for Nursing Home Staff
If the patient is managed comprehensively in the community we can help take better care of patients, increase their quality of life, and reduce the number of unnecessary hospitalizations.