containerization

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containerization

[kən‚tā·nə·rə′zā·shən]
(industrial engineering)
The practice of placing cargo in large containers such as truck trailers to facilitate loading on and off ships and railroad flat cars.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lightweight Composite Air Cargo Containers," SAE Int.
Cobalt-60 from a medical device, improperly disposed in Saudi Arabia and loaded with scrap metal bound for Italy, exposes the challenges of inspecting cargo containers
New Delhi, February 18 (ANI): After warning of the potential threat of smuggling nuclear weapons in cargo containers, India's navy chief admiral Sureesh Mehta said that security measures like examining through X-ray machines at ports are mandatory to ensure cent percent security.
5) Logistics: Space constraints can require seaports to place scanning equipment miles from where cargo containers are stored, and some containers are only available for scanning for a short period of time and may be difficult to access.
Thanks to their size and strength, old sea cargo containers have for years enjoyed second lives as temporary or emergency housing, and have even been considered for underground tornado shelters.
But focusing on cargo containers and ports without also securing cruise ships and ferries "is like bolting down the front door of a house and leaving the back door wide open," the report said.
Southern California's port complex is the largest in the country, handling about 14 million cargo containers annually.
ports and waterways, whereas the primary mission of CBP is to inspect cargoes and cargo containers entering U.
Like the A-22 cargo container, it could be used for both high- and low-velocity CDS airdrops.
Customs and Border Protection officers and host nation counterparts work together to target high-risk cargo containers destined for the United States.
The facility handled 554,041 20-foot-long metal cargo containers, called ton equivalent milts or TEUs in 2002, compared to Miami's 980,743 TEUs the same year.
Their aim: to test how terrorist bombs inside baggage and cargo containers tear apart an airplane.