Carinthia

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Carinthia

(kərĭn`thēə), Ger. Kärnten, province (1991 pop. 547,798), c.3,680 sq mi (9,531 sq km), S Austria. KlagenfurtKlagenfurt
, city (1991 pop. 89,415), capital of Carinthia prov., S Austria, on the Glan River. Situated in a mountain lake region, it is a noted winter sports center with a bustling tourist trade.
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 is the capital. Predominantly mountainous, it is the southernmost Austrian province, bordering on Italy and Slovenia in the south. The GrossglocknerGrossglockner
, peak, 12,460 ft (3,797 m) high, in Tyrol, S Austria, the highest point in the Hohe Tauern range and in Austria. It is traversed by the Grossglocknerstrasse (built 1930–35), a magnificent Alpine highway rising up to 7,770 ft (2,368 m).
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, the highest point in Austria (12,460 ft/3,797 m), rises in the northeast, at the Tyrol province border. Carinthia has mines (lead, zinc, and magnesite) and well-developed farms (especially in the fertile Drava, or Drau, plain). Manufactures of the province include electrotechnical products, shoes, paper and pulp, and chemicals. There is also an active tourist trade, particularly along the Wörther See, a lake near Klagenfurt. In 976, Carinthia, which then included Istria, Carniola, and Styria, was detached from BavariaBavaria
, Ger. Bayern, state (1994 pop. 11,600,000), 27,239 sq mi (70,549 sq km), S Germany. Munich is the capital. The largest state of Germany, Bavaria is bordered by the Czech Republic on the east, by Austria on the southeast and south, by Baden-Württemberg on the
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 and made an independent duchy. Acquired by Ottocar II of Bohemia in 1269, it fell to Rudolf IRudolf I
or Rudolf of Hapsburg
, 1218–91, German king (1273–91), first king of the Hapsburg dynasty. Rudolf's election as king ended the interregnum (1250–73), during which time there was no accepted German king or Holy Roman emperor.
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 of Hapsburg in 1276 and in 1335 became an Austrian crown land. By the Treaty of Saint-Germain (1919) the province lost some minor territories to Italy and Yugoslavia. The only Austrian province with an appreciable ethnic minority, Carinthia has a Slovene population of approximately 2.7% in the south.

Carinthia

 

a historical region in Central Europe, in the Drava River basin.

The territory of Carinthia was settled toward the end of the sixth century by the Slovenes, a Slavic people. In the first half of the seventh century, it was part of Samo’s state; next, it became part of Carantania; and with the disintegration of the latter at the beginning of the 11th century, Carinthia was made a separate duchy. Beginning in the 12th century Carinthia was subjected to vigorous germanization as a result of which the northern part became German. After 1282 it was part of the holdings of the Count of Tirol. In 1335 it became a possession of the Hapsburgs. In 1849 it was made an independent administrative unit (crown land) of the Austrian Empire. In the second half of the 19th century the ethnic boundary of the Slovenes moved to the south. According to the terms of the Treaty of St. Germain (1919), the greater part of Carinthia was made into one of the provinces of Austria (the Klagenfurt region was given to Austria following a plebiscite in 1920); the Mezica River valley, along with Dravograd and Jezersko, went to the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (which became Yugoslavia in 1929); and the Kanal Valley and Trbiz (Treviso) went to Italy. These territorial arrangements were confirmed by the Italian Peace Treaty of 1947 and the Austrian State Treaty of 1955.


Carinthia

 

(Kärnten), a province in southern Austria. Area, 9, 500 sq km. Population, 519, 000 (1968), one-fifth of whom are Slovenes and Croatians. The administrative center is Klagenfurt.

Located in Carinthia are the northern slopes of the Carnic Alps, the Karawanken, the southern spurs of the Hohe Tauern, and other ranges of the Eastern Alps. The peaks range in height from 3, 300 to 3, 700 m. The mountains in the southern part are composed mostly of limestones; the northern mountains, predominantly of crystalline rocks. The mountains are divided by intermontane basins such as the Klagenfurt Basin. Approximately half of the territory is covered with forests. Out of the total working population, 30 percent are engaged in industry and crafts, 19 percent in agriculture and forestry, and 12 percent in trade and transport. Magnesite is mined at Radenthein and lead-zinc ores at Bleiberg-Kreuth. Lumbering and the wood-products industry are well developed, as is the pulp and paper industry. Gailitz is an important center for nonferrous metallurgy. Dairy and meat livestock farming predominate in agriculture. Half the arable land is given over to feed crops, including grasses. There is shipping on the Drau River. The mountains attract tourists.

Carinthia

a state of S Austria: an independent duchy from 976 to 1276; mainly mountainous, with many lakes and resorts. Capital: Klagenfurt. Pop.: 559 440 (2003 est.). Area: 9533 sq. km (3681 sq. miles)