Clausewitz

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Clausewitz

Karl von . 1780--1831, Prussian general, noted for his works on military strategy, esp Vom Kriege (1833)
References in periodicals archive ?
As Carl von Clausewitz said in his famous book On War, war is the continuation of policy by other means.
As a practitioner who has learned the principles of the legendary Prussian military strategist Carl von Clausewitz very well, Putin knows that "war is the continuation of politics by other means.
Carl von Clausewitz, perhaps Europe's most acclaimed military theorist, insisted that war is "not merely an act of policy but a true political instrument, a continuation of political intercourse, carried on with other means".
Carl von Clausewitz, On War, translated and edited by Michael Howard and Peter Paret (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1976), II/1:128.
Carl von Clausewitz (1780-1831) was a Prussian general and military theorist, perhaps best known for his timeless aphorism "War is the continuation of politics by other means".
Gawrych clearly shows that Ataturk's understanding of the relationship between military and political matters owed a great deal to his reading of the great Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz.
In his 1832 work On War, Carl von Clausewitz scribes a decidedly different angle on the art of war.
Anastasiades is a lucky man that the famous Prussian theorist of war Carl von Clausewitz passed away two centuries ago.
The importance of logistics, having a coherent strategy, and military intelligence are all referenced, as are the theories of Carl von Clausewitz, Sun Tzu, and other noted military theorists of the past.
One of the most common traps planners fall into is what Carl von Clausewitz called methodism.
With the instruments of humanity's collective suicide yet to be invented, war could still be viewed, as the Prussian strategist Carl von Clausewitz famously put it, as "the continuation of politics by other means.
Carl von Clausewitz, the imposing German general whose theories about war remain influential nearly 200 years after his death, observed that "public opinion is won through great victories and the occupation of the enemy's capital.