Carnac

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Carnac

(kärnäk`), town (1993 est. pop. 4,322), Morbihan dept., NW France, in Brittany, at the foot of the Quiberon peninsula. It is the site of remarkable megalithic monumentsmegalithic monument
[Gr.,=large stone], in archaeology, a construction involving one or several roughly hewn stone slabs of great size; it is usually of prehistoric antiquity.
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, particularly the menhirmenhir
[Breton,=long stone], in archaeology, name given to the single standing stones of Western Europe, and by extension to those of other lands. Their size varies and their shape is rough and squared, tapering toward the top. See megalithic monuments.
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. The menhirs, formerly ascribed to the druids, extend along the coast in 11 parallel rows, 1,100 yd (1,006 m) long; some are 20 ft (6.1 m) high. The sea resort of Carnac-Plage is nearby.

Carnac

 

a village in southern Brittany, in the department of Morbihan, in France. Located in the vicinity of Carnac are megalithic monuments dating from the late Neolithic and early Bronze ages (end of the third through the first half of the second millennium b.c.). The monuments include cromlechs, avenues of menhirs, and oval and elongated mounds, some with chambers beneath them. Among the items found in the chambers were stone axes, arrowheads, beads, and clay dishes. Most of the avenues of menhirs fall into one of three groups, located along one line at a set distance from the others. Various images are carved on a number of the menhirs.

REFERENCES

Le Rouzic, Z. Carnac. [Rennes] 1955.
Niel, F. “Dolmens et menhirs.” In the collection Que sais-je?, 1958, no. 764.
“Carnac.” In The Concise Encyclopedia of Archaeology, 2nd ed. London, 1970.

Carnac

a village in NW France: noted for its many megalithic monuments, including alignments of stone menhirs