Carnap


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Carnap

Rudolf. 1891--1970, US logical positivist philosopher, born in Germany: attempted to construct a formal language for the empirical sciences that would eliminate ambiguity
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Leaving out Neo-Kantianism, she continues with the problem of verification discussed by the Vienna Circle and other associated logical positivists, in particular Carnap, who wrote his Logical Syntax of Language in 1937 in order to eliminate metaphysical questions by showing that those questions are linguistically (and therefore logically) not well-formed.
Carnap (1938) defines pragmatics as such: "If in an investigation explicit reference is made to the speaker, or to put it in more general terms, to the user of the language, then we assign it to the field of pragmatics.
6) We see in Carnap, one of the founders of analytic philosophy, the endorsement of a specific political agenda of a social technological sort not based on any actual social scientific study.
That Richard Wilbur kept a sacred fire going for fifty years by blowing on it with his breath--the ancient fire of metaphysics that had nearly been drowned by Rudolf Carnap, Willard Quine, and the deconstructionists--this history has gone largely unnoticed.
orientations of philosophy, each with their prophets: the hermeneutic associated with Heidegger and Gadamer, a German site, the site of romanticism; the analytic associated with Carnap and Wittgenstein, the Vienna circle that dominates academic philosophy in England and the United States; and the post-modern associated with Derrida and Lyotard, "most active in France, [but] equally very active in Spain, Italy and Latin America".
380) also attacked the positivist reliance on rules or logic, referring to the positivists Herbert Feigl and Rudolph Carnap for illustration.
Boyd) Anti-realists such as Kuhn, Van Frassen, and Carnap tend to refute these concepts.
Although logical positivism is not a single philosophical view, it can, for present purposes, be considered to be the position developed between the 1920s and early 1930s by members of the Vienna Circle such as Schlick, Carnap, Neurath, Feigl and Reichenbach.
Rudolf Carnap, Quine on Analyticity, in DEAR CARNAP, DEAR VAN: THE QUINE-CARNAP CORRESPONDENCE AND RELATED WORK, 427-32 (Richard Creath ed.
1938 "Foundations of the theory of signs", in: Otto Neurath -- Rudolf Carnap -- Charles Morris (eds.
See RUDOLF CARNAP, THE LOGICAL STRUCTRURE OF THE WORLD (Rolf A.