Carnea


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Carnea

August-September
The Carnea, also spelled Karneia, Karnea, or Carneia, was one of ancient Sparta's three principal religious festivals—the other two being the Hyacinthia and the Gymnopaidiai—which were observed in many parts of the Peloponnesus as well as in Cyrene, Magna Graecia, and elsewhere. It was the ultimate expression of the cult of Apollo Karneios, the ram god of flocks and herds and of fertility in general. It was held during the month of Carneus (August-September) and dates back to 676 b.c.e. The Carnea was both a vintage festival and a military one, Apollo being expected to help his people both by promoting the harvest and by supporting them in battle. Young men called staphylodromoi, or "grape-cluster-runners," chased after a man wearing garlands. It was considered a good omen for the city if they caught him and a bad one if they didn't.
No military operations could be held during this festival, and it is said that the Spartans might not have been defeated by the Persians at Thermopylae if the Carnea hadn't prevented the movement of their main army.
SOURCES:
DictFolkMyth-1984, pp. 67, 192
OxClassDict-1970, p. 206
RelHolCal-2004, p. 273
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References in periodicals archive ?
The five on offer - one plant of each - include two varieties of low, spreading Erica carnea, both holders of the Royal Horticultural Society's prestigious award of garden merit:
Magnoliales: Annonaceae) seeds, wherein larvae of Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) were less susceptible than adults of Orius insidiosus (Say) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae).
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Winter flowering varieties include Erica Carnea, Erica X Darleyensis and Erica Erigena.
2007) investigated the impact of GF-120 on a green lacewing (Chrysoperla carnea [Stephens]), and showed that ingestion clearly poses some risk to lacewing populations due to adult mortality and reduced fecundity.
carnea Springwood White, a vigorous, trailing variety with a profusion of white flowers above white green foliage.
Ipomoea carnea es una planta toxica debido a los alcaloides swainsonina y calisteginas, que provoca perdidas economicas en la produccion animal del nordeste argentino.
The plant figured in Paxton's Flower Garden is from Chile; in 1857 Austrian botanist Johann Beer gave it the new name Bromelia carnea and the current name is Ochagavia carnea.