Carneades


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Carneades

(kärnē`ədēz), 213–129 B.C., Greek philosopher, b. Cyrene. He studied at Athens under Diogenes the Stoic, but reacted against Stoicism and joined the AcademyAcademy,
school founded by Plato near Athens c.387 B.C. It took its name from the garden (named for the hero Academus) in which it was located. Plato's followers met there for nine centuries until, along with other pagan schools, it was closed by Emperor Justinian in A.D. 529.
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, where he taught a skepticism similar to that of ArcesilausArcesilaus
, c.316–c.241 B.C., Greek philosopher of Pitane in Aeolis. He was the principal figure of the Middle Academy. Despite his position in the Academy, his teachings diverged from Platonic doctrine.
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. He denied the possibility of absolute certainty in knowledge; it is disputed whether he held that probable knowledge was adequate to guide a person's actions. He recognized three degrees of probability, and his teaching anticipated modern discussions of the nature of empirical knowledge.

Carneades

 

Born in 214 b.c.; died in 129 b.c. Native of Cyrene. Ancient Greek philosopher; head of Plato’s Academy and founder of the so-called New, or Third, Academy.

An adherent of skepticism, Carneades developed a theory of probability. He left no written works. Carneades was a member of the delegation of philosophers sent to Rome in 156–155 B.C.

REFERENCES

Rikhter, R. Skeptitsizm v filosofii, vol. 1. St. Petersburg, 1910. Pages 80–83.
Credaro, L. Lo scetticismo degli accademici, vols. 1–2. Milan, 1889–93.
References in periodicals archive ?
The two invited talks cover a reconstruction of Carneades and abstract dialectical frameworks, and types of dialogue and burdens of proof.
The same can be said, with some qualifications, of Carneades of Cyrene (214-129/8), the other leading sceptical Academic.
Hahm, "Plato, Carneades, and Cicero's Philus (Cicero, Rep.
82) The ancient Skeptics, Arcesilaus and Carneades in particular, however, showed clearly that no subjective impression purporting to reveal anything about the world beyond consciousness can bear its own warrant.
Apparently, Chrysippus's name ('golden horse') was also joked about and played around with by his contemporaries, with Carneades, for example, dubbing him 'Crypsippus', 'hidden horse' or 'obscure horse'--the proverbial 'dark horse'.
Carneades with the Bust of Paniscus by Luca Giordano (1634-1705), c.
Although the Academy was undergoing a reaction in Cicero's time, the conventions of Academic discussion had been dominated by the skepticism of Carneades, "it being an accepted tradition of the Academy always and against all comers to be of the opposition in debate" (I.
Carneades (Richard Mitchell/Anthony Tory) produces the performance of the day at Worcester, winning the novice chase by a distance.
At times, the Enlightenment stalwarts Hume and Montesquieu might be granted some insight denied others; Carneades of the second century BC, Machiavelli in the sixteenth century, and Malebranche in the seventeenth were also conscripted for the wiser cause.
The discovery of a previously unnoticed analogy between the epistemological ideas of Robert Frost and the ancient Greek philosopher Carneades suggests that the voluminous contents of online databases may collectively be a new kind of primary source.
48) The thesis is attributed to Carneades by Sextus Empiricus (Against the Professors 7, 159-65), and can be traced back to Arcesilaus (Cicero, Academica 2.
The arguments of the Athenian envoys presented in the "Melian Dialogue" by Thucydides, of Thrasymachus in Plato's Republic, and of Carneades, to whom Grotius refers, all furnish a great challenge to the classical view of the unity of politics and ethics.