Carnot efficiency


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Carnot efficiency

[kär′nō i′fish·ən·sē]
(thermodynamics)
The efficiency of a Carnot engine receiving heat at a temperature absolute T1 and giving it up at a lower temperature absolute T2; equal to (T1-T2)/ T1.
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These MHD generators have a carnot efficiency of around 85 percent, which is much better than steam turbines.
Carnot efficiency was calculated using a cold source temperature of 120[degrees]F (49[degrees]C) and a heat source temperature either equal to the exhaust gas temperature or limited at some lower temperature to avoid working fluid decomposition.
Considering that high pressure steam can be produced at a temperature of 608[degrees]F (320[degrees]C) and that the return temperature of the steam to the collector array would be approximately 212[degrees]F (100[degrees]C), a Carnot efficiency of approximately around 37% is expected.
At temperature T, the maximum increment of work for a heat interaction dQ is proportional to the Carnot efficiency at that temperature, where Carnot efficiency is the same as the exergetic temperature defined above,
Power Chips are projected to achieve 80% of Carnot efficiency, whereas a conventional internal combustion engine typically wastes more than two-thirds of the available energy from burning gasoline.
The upper limit on efficiency for all Rankine cycles is the Carnot efficiency, which is proportional to the difference between the vaporizing and condensing temperatures as shown in Equation 4.
We know, for example, that the energy-conversion efficiency of a thermal power plant (Figure 1) cannot exceed the Carnot efficiency (1 - T.