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Carolingians

(kărəlĭn`jēənz), dynasty of Frankish rulers, founded in the 7th cent. by Pepin of LandenPepin of Landen
(Pepin I), d. 639?, mayor of the palace of the Frankish kingdom of Austrasia. With Arnulf, bishop of Metz, he called in King Clotaire II of Neustria to overthrow (613) Queen Brunhilda of Austrasia.
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, who, as mayor of the palace, ruled the East Frankish Kingdom of Austrasia for Dagobert I. His descendants, Pepin of HeristalPepin of Heristal
(Pepin II) , d. 714, mayor of the palace (680–714) of the Frankish territory of Austrasia; grandson of Pepin of Landen and father of Charles Martel.
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, Charles MartelCharles Martel
[O.Fr.,=Charles the Hammer], 688?–741, Frankish ruler, illegitimate son of Pepin of Heristal and grandfather of Charlemagne. After the death of his father (714) he seized power in Austrasia from Pepin's widow, who was ruling as regent for her grandsons, and
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, CarlomanCarloman,
d. 754, mayor of the palace in the kingdom of Austrasia after the death (741) of his father, Charles Martel. Ruling with his brother, Pepin the Short, he carried on successful wars against the dukes of Aquitaine, the Saxons, the Swabians, and the Bavarians.
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, and Pepin the ShortPepin the Short
(Pepin III), c.714–768, first Carolingian king of the Franks (751–68), son of Charles Martel and father of Charlemagne. Succeeding his father as mayor of the palace (741), he ruled Neustria, Burgundy, and Provence, while his brother Carloman (d.
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, continued to govern the territories under the nominal kingship of the MerovingiansMerovingians,
dynasty of Frankish kings, descended, according to tradition, from Merovech, chief of the Salian Franks, whose son was Childeric I and whose grandson was Clovis I, the founder of the Frankish monarchy.
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. In 751, with the knowledge and backing of Pope Zacharias, Pepin the Short deposed the last Merovingian king, Childeric III. To emphasize the importance of the church and to legitimize his reign, Pepin was consecrated by a bishop of the Roman church. The family was at its height under Pepin's son, CharlemagneCharlemagne
(Charles the Great or Charles I) [O.Fr.,=Charles the great], 742?–814, emperor of the West (800–814), Carolingian king of the Franks (768–814).
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, who was crowned emperor in 800. His empire was divided by the Treaty of Verdun (843) after the death of his son, Emperor Louis ILouis I
or Louis the Pious,
Fr. Louis le Pieux or Louis le Débonnaire, 778–840, emperor of the West (814–40), son and successor of Charlemagne. He was crowned king of Aquitaine in 781 and co-emperor with his father in 813.
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, among Louis's three sons. Lothair ILothair I
, 795–855, emperor of the West (840–55), son and successor of Louis I. In 817 his father crowned him coemperor. He was recrowned (823) at Rome by the pope and issued (824) a constitution, proclaiming his right to confirm papal elections.
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 inherited the imperial title and the middle part of the empire. Louis the GermanLouis the German,
c.804–876, king of the East Franks (817–76). When his father, Emperor of the West Louis I, partitioned the empire in 817, Louis received Bavaria and adjacent territories.
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 founded a dynasty that ruled in Germany (kingdom of the East Franks) until 911, his successors being Charles IIICharles III
or Charles the Fat,
839–88, emperor of the West (881–87), king of the East Franks (882–87), and king of the West Franks (884–87); son of Louis the German, at whose death he inherited Swabia (876).
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 (Charles the Fat), ArnulfArnulf
, c.850–899, Carolingian emperor (896–99), king of the East Franks (887–99), illegitimate son of Carloman of Bavaria. In 887 he led the rebellion of the kingdom of the East Franks (Germany) against his uncle, Carolingian Emperor Charles III, and was
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, and Louis the ChildLouis the Child,
893–911, German king (900–911), son and successor of King Arnulf. He was the last of the German line of the Carolingians. The archbishop of Mainz was regent for him.
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. The third son of Louis I, Charles IICharles II
or Charles the Bald,
823–77, emperor of the West (875–77) and king of the West Franks (843–77); son of Emperor Louis I by a second marriage.
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 (Charles the Bald), founded the French Carolingian dynasty, which ruled, with interruptions, until 987. Its rulers were Louis IILouis II
or Louis the Stammerer,
846–79, French king. He succeeded (877) his father, Emperor of the West Charles II, as king. On Louis's death his kingdom was divided between his sons Carloman and Louis III.
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 (Louis the Stammerer), Louis IIILouis III,
c.863–882, French king, son of King Louis II. He became joint ruler with his brother Carloman on the death of Louis II (879), despite the attempts of Louis the Younger to become French king.
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, CarlomanCarloman,
d. 884, king of the West Franks (France), son of King Louis II (Louis the Stammerer). He became joint ruler with his brother Louis III in 879. His reign was disturbed by revolts in Burgundy, by the loss (879) of Provence to Boso, count of Arles, and by an invasion of
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, Charles IIICharles III
(Charles the Simple), 879–929, French king (893–923), son of King Louis II (Louis the Stammerer). As a child he was excluded from the succession at the death (884) of his half-brother Carloman and at the deposition (887) of King Charles III (Charles the
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 (Charles the Simple), Louis IVLouis IV
or Louis d'Outremer
[Fr.,=Louis from overseas], 921–54, French king (936–54), son of King Charles III (Charles the Simple). He spent his youth as an exile in England, but at the death of King Raoul he was recalled by the nobles under the leadership
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 (Louis d'Outremer), LothairLothair,
941–86, French king (954–86), son and successor of King Louis IV. During the early part of his reign he was dominated by Hugh the Great. Even after Hugh's death he was involved in conflict with the great feudal lords and controlled only a small part of
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 (941–86), and Louis VLouis V
(Louis the Sluggard), c.967–987, last French king of the Carolingian dynasty; son of King Lothair. His father had him crowned in 979, but he did not become king until Lothair's death in 986. He was childless and was succeeded by Hugh Capet.
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. In the Carolingian period, a landed economy was firmly established. The kings consolidated their rule by issuing capitulariescapitularies
, decrees and written commands of the Carolingian kings of the Franks, so called because they were divided into capitula, or chapters. Both legislative and administrative, they were the chief written instrument of royal authority.
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 and worked closely with church officials. Until the late 9th cent., Charlemagne and his successors were generous patrons of the arts. He encouraged the Carolingian Renaissance, a return to Roman classicism and Byzantine and Greco-Roman styles. Charlemagne successfully conquered all of Gaul and parts of Germany and Italy. He created a papal state in central Italy in 774. After his death the kingdom was divided; its authority, eventually eroded, was reestablished in France in 893.

Bibliography

See H. Fichtenau, The Carolingian Empire (1949; tr. 1957, repr. 1965); D. Bullough, The Age of Charlemagne (1965); F. L. Ganshof, The Carolingians and the Frankish Monarchy (tr. 1971); E. James, The Origins of France: Clovis and the Capetians, A.D. 500–1000 (1982); R. McKitternick, The Frankish Kingdoms under the Carolingians (1983).

Carolingians

 

a royal and imperial dynasty of the Frank-ish state, named for Charlemagne.

The Carolingians replaced the Merovingians in 751 and ceased to exist in the tenth century. The early development of the Carolingian (Pepinid) line began in the seventh century, when their ancestor, Pepin of Landen, became chief of Austrasia. His grandson, Pepin of Herstal (died in 714), ruled as chief of the whole Frankish state, and his great-grandson, Charles Martel (chief, 715-41), strengthened the position of the family even more by his energetic activity. He laid the ground for the dynastic coup which his son, Pepin the Short, carried out in 751 to establish himself as the first Frankish king of the Carolingian line. The dynasty reached its apogee under Charlemagne (ruled 768-814, emperor from 800), who subordinated almost all of Western Europe to his authority. On Charlemagne’s death, the imperial crown passed to his son Louis the Pious (ruled 814-^40). By the Treaty of Verdun in 843, the empire was divided among the sons of Louis: Lothair, Louis the German, and Charles the Bald. Charles III the Fat (emperor 881-87) restored the unity of the empire for a short time. After its final breakup, the Carolingians ruled in Italy until 905, in the East Frankish kingdom (Germany) until 911, and in the West Frankish kingdom (France) until 987.

References in periodicals archive ?
Earlier work on Frankish formularies, in particular Karl Zeumer's foundational edition of 1886 for Monumenta Germaniae Historica, concentrated on these problems of time and space, seeking to determine when individual formulae were created and how extensive was their spread in the Merovingian and Carolingian world.
Drawing parallels between the treatment of tradition, order, and worship in the OCR and at the Carolingian court, the chapter argues that the substance of the OCR gives voice to concerns animating its historical milieu.
Susan Rankin purports to explore aspects of the York liturgy but concludes with the compelling suggestion that the Gregorian repertory of the Carolingian reforms may not have been as stable as it was presumed to have been.
5), but allows for the dynamic of the material culture to define the complexities of the transformation of north-west Europe during two chronologically distinct periods: the Age of the Carolingians, AD 600-900, and the period from the Viking Age to the Angevin hegemony (p.
After their father's death, Charlemagne and his brother, Carloman, become rulers of the Carolingian kingdom.
Pope John VIII (872-882) named the new church Sancta Ecclesia Marabensis in a letter he sent to the Moravian ruler Svatopluk, she says, and charged it with the pastoral care of the Slavic peoples living beyond the eastern border of the Carolingian realm.
Paul Kershaw's book is the first comprehensive study of the theme of peace in the imagination of the court advisors, imperial biographers, and royal panegyrists who formulated and promoted the ideals of Christian rulership in the period between the end of the western Roman Empire in the late fifth century and the waning of Carolingian authority at the close of the ninth century.
The emphasis of the show is on the Carolingian legacy in Switzerland.
Levy has provided fresh translations of six significant medieval commentaries on Galatians, including those by monastic authors from the Carolingian period as well as by university professors from the scholastic age.
The first chapter begins with Rome and Italy after Constantine had moved the capital and in a few pages gives an overview of the rest of the book: the growth of Christian writing and scholarship, scriptoria, the crucial role of monks and monasteries, the Carolingian Renaissance, and the rise of universities.
In addition to numerous archaeological illustrations, Goodson deftly handles an array of early modern antiquarian texts as aids to reconstruct Pascal's ninth-century building projects, which in turn allows the author to argue that the pope drew on a variety of architectural traditions to build his churches in distinction to those who see only a Carolingian "revival" of purely Constantinian architecture.
Just the details of what he calls the three Carolingian "renaissances" are enough to illustrate the multiplicity of efforts to gather Greek knowledge in the west.