Carpocrates

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Carpocrates

(kärpŏk`rətēz), fl. c.130–c.150, Alexandrian philosopher, founder with his son Epiphanes of a Hellenistic sect, notoriously licentious, related to Gnosticism. Epiphanes wrote a treatise, On Justice, that advocated communal ownership of property, including women; he died, age 17, at Kefallinía and was long worshiped as a deity there. The Carpocratians believed that men had formerly been united with the Absolute, had been corrupted, and would, by despising creation, be saved in this life or else later through successive transmigrations. Jesus, they held, was but one of several wise men who had achieved deliverance.
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The idea that Origen's universalism drew from earlier gnostic universalism--which existed in Alexandria prior to Origen's lifetime among the Carpocratians, Basilideans, and Valentinians--deserves more attention than the three pages Ramelli devoted to it (87-89).
Roscoe takes us back 2,000 years to the contentious, apocalyptic politics of a multicultural Jerusalem overrun with Roman rule, to the ministry, death, and deification of Jesus, and to the eventual rise of competing Jewish-Hellenic-Christian sects (Gnostics, Carpocratians, and others).
On the other hand, there is to be found no "reliable evidence for the use of the Fourth Gospel by the Basilideans, Saturnilians, Carpocratians, and various other sects before the middle of the second century.