Silphidae

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Silphidae

[′sil·fə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The carrion beetles, a family of coleopteran insects in the superfamily Staphylinoidea.

Silphidae

 

a family of beetles. Body length, 6–40 mm. The flat, motile larvae resemble wood lice. Of the more than 500 species, 80 are encountered in the USSR. The Silphidae are distributed on all continents, principally in countries with temperate climates. Most silphids, including Silpha obscura and the Necrophorus, feed on carrion. A few species are predators, for example, the beneficial beetle Xylodrepa quadripunctata, which preys on caterpillars that damage orchards and forests. There are some herbivorous silphids; the beetle Aclypea opaca damages sugar beets and other vegetables.

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Traps baited with isopropanol attract the American Carrion Beetle, Necrophila americana (L.
The presence of rare carrion beetle species such as the federally endangered American burying beetle (Nicrophorus americanus Olivier) concerns conservationists who want to preserve their habitats.
Carrion beetles scuttle in and out of eye holes, backs shelled yellow and black, like a child's faith in the turning of day and night, showing us how the spirit departs, how the flesh vanishes, too.
Abstract: We provide information on the carrion beetles from two localities of Gomez Farias, Jalisco, Mexico, including their abundance, diversity, phenology and faunistic similarity.
While larger scavengers like vultures and hyenas tear off hunks of flesh, smaller ones like carrion beetles and flies break down the majority of a carcass.
Scenario 1 * Carrion flies * Predatory flies * Carrion beetles * Predatory beetles * Hair and skin beetles Scenario 2 * Blow flies * Flesh flies * Predatory flies * Carrion beetles * Rove beetles * Carpet beetles * Clothes moths
There were crocodile newts, bamboo bats and rats, the astonishingly human snub-nosed monkeys - and the bizarre plant which stinks of rotting flesh at night to attract carrion beetles, traps them for 24 hours until they're covered in pollen, then lets them go to visit other stinky flowers and ensure the continuance of a pungent species.
Because carrion beetles (Silphidae) rely on carcasses for food and breeding material, one might expect them to be concentrated near the ground where carrion is most readily available.
The fattened young disperse to pupate in nearby soil and emerge as carrion beetles a couple months later.
We never did find The Ultimate Insects, the carrion beetles gnawing at a dead mouse on pages 112 to 113.
Like its relative the skunk cabbage, the corpse flower heats up to near human body temperature--the better to exude the sulfuric gases that attract carrion beetles and other insects that do its bidding.