Carter

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Carter

1. Angela. 1940--92, British novelist and writer; her novels include The Magic Toyshop (1967) and Nights at the Circus (1984)
2. Elliot (Cook). born 1908, US composer. His works include the Piano Sonata (1945--46), four string quartets, and other orchestral pieces: Pulitzer Prize 1960, 1973
3. Howard. 1873--1939, English Egyptologist: excavated the tomb of the Pharaoh Tutankhamen
4. James Earl, known as Jimmy. born 1924, US Democratic statesman; 39th president of the US (1977--81)
References in periodicals archive ?
Professor Stein is apparently terminating his association with the Carter Center, solely as a result of Carter's new book, Palestine: Peace, Not Apartheid.
Isaac painstakingly draws out the vicissitudes of all these struggles over the years of the diary, and yet he reconstructs considerably more than that: a typical year in the working life of a plantation, the contents of Carter's vast library, the practice of plantation medicine, the administration of colonial government--indeed, every dimension of Carter's world.
Carter's explanation of events doesn't offer any proof that would lead one to believe otherwise.
But Carter's downfall wasn't assured until a pair of foreign policy bungles in the year before the election.
By 1980, two years into Carter's reign, Henderson's most grating critic, Jesuit Fr.
The military money to El Salvador was one of Carter's last decisions as President, and Ronald Reagan gladly took it from there.
Carter's teaching has taken him around the globe, including two visits to Russia with the American Dance Festival.
Carter's chronological arrangement within each heading reveals the maturation of Carey's mission over its life.
Although the movie has been criticized for distorting the facts of the legal battles and circumstances of Carter's life, one must allow a certain poetic license for filmmakers.
Carter's sincerity occasionally borders on the simplistic.
Some of Carter's critics seem to think so, but for the most part, the arguments in The Culture of Disbelief are persuasive.
Jimmy Carter's critics have argued that his presidential failures were of his own making - that he was a victim of his own style.