Cartesian


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Cartesian

1. of or relating to the works of René Descartes (1596--1650), the French philosopher and mathematician
2. of, relating to, or used in Descartes' mathematical system
3. of, relating to, or derived from Descartes' philosophy, esp his contentions that personal identity consists in the continued existence of a unique mind and that the mind and body are connected causally
References in periodicals archive ?
The straight Cartesian theory is that you've got a powerful homunculus at the center of the self doing all the work.
Until the time of Freud, there was no proper theoretical framework in which to reject the Cartesian idea of equating mind with consciousness.
Conax, part of the Kudelski Group and a leader in total content and service protection for digital entertainment services, today announced Conax Core Access completed Cartesians Farncombe Security Audit.
As users of the Toshiba Machine Cartesian range can attest, one of the benefits the line offers is that the units can be shipped assembled for usage straight from the box.
Steeped not just in the Cartesian corpus itself but also the massive secondary literature, Hassing focuses specifically on a number of themes he regards as having received less attention in this scholarly literature, among which this reviewer found most compelling Hassing's identification and delineation of a third form of Cartesian dualism, beyond both Descartes's familiar metaphysical dualism and the lesser-known but arguably even more significant "epistemological dualism," as Hassing calls it, first pointed out by Richard Kennington, between the "light of nature" (scientific reason) and the "teaching of nature" (inherent practical instincts and natural egoism of the human mind-body composite).
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This also leads to the n-th roots of unity, although the location of these n-roots relative to the Cartesian plane is commonly misunderstood (see Stroud (1986, Programme 2, Theory of Equations); he (incorrectly) places the complex conjugate roots in the Cartesian plane at one of the turning points of a cubic equation.
That the derivative adjective for the French philosopher and mathematician Rene Descartes should be Cartesian might seem puzzling at first.
As we move into the next section, Gobert's thesis really takes hold: he demonstrates with great flair and precision a largely overlooked aspect of theatre history, namely the interaction (as the book's subtitle would have it) of the newly-articulated Cartesian subject (and subjectivity) and the transformation of Neoclassical theatrical modes by prominent writers such as Corneille and Dryden.
Cartesian robots get their name from the French philosopher and mathematician Rene Descartes, who used three basic X-Y-Z axes to define three-dimensional space.
It is well known that the Cartesian field in a well stirred (overmoded) RC follows complex Gaussian distribution [1].
Now, the property of local cartesian closedness is very powerful and well known to be shared, for instance, by any elementary topos.